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I want my bash-script to sleep until a specific time. So I want a command like "sleep" which takes no interval but a end-time and sleeps until then.

The "at"-deamon is no solution as I need to block a running script until a date/time.

Is there such a command?

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11 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

As mentioned by Outlaw Programmer, I think the solution is just to sleep for the correct number of seconds.

To do this in bash, do the following:

current_epoch=$(date +%s)
target_epoch=$(date -d '01/01/2010 12:00' +%s)

sleep_seconds=$(( $target_epoch - $current_epoch ))

sleep $sleep_seconds
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7  
Thanks for that, I wrote a small shell-script to get a "sleepuntil" command. –  theomega Mar 14 '09 at 15:20
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Use sleep, but compute the time using date. You'll want to use date -d for this. For example, let's say you wanted to wait until next week:

expr `date -d "next week" +%s` - `date -d "now" +%s`

Just substitute "next week" with whatever date you'd like to wait for, then assign this expression to a value, and sleep for that many seconds:

startTime=$(date +%s)
endTime=$(date -d "next week" +%s)
timeToWait=$(($endTime- $startTime))
sleep $timeToWait

All done!

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It's worth expanding on how you'd assign the value to a variable, since timeToWait=expr ... won't work directly, and you can't use backticks because they won't nest, so you'll have to use $(), or temporary variables. –  SpoonMeiser Mar 14 '09 at 15:05
    
Good suggestion; I'll modify mine to make that clearer so that people don't get the wrong idea. –  John Feminella Mar 14 '09 at 15:37
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To follow on SpoonMeiser's answer, here's a specific example:

$cat ./reviveself

#!/bin/bash

# save my process ID
rspid=$$

# schedule my own resuscitation
# /bin/sh seems to dislike the SIGCONT form, so I use CONT
# at can accept specific dates and times as well as relative ones
# you can even do something like "at thursday" which would occur on a 
# multiple of 24 hours rather than the beginning of the day
echo "kill -CONT $rspid"|at now + 2 minutes

# knock myself unconscious
# bash is happy with symbolic signals
kill -SIGSTOP $rspid

# do something to prove I'm alive
date>>reviveself.out
$
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I think you want to schedule a SIGCONT, rather than another SIGSTOP, so either the signal, or the comment is wrong. Otherwise, nice to see a proper example. –  SpoonMeiser May 5 '09 at 23:09
    
Oops, I typo'd the comment. Now fixed. But you have to watch using numeric signals, since they can be different. –  Dennis Williamson May 6 '09 at 5:19
    
I found that dash seems to not understand SIGCONT, so at first I used -18 which is non-portable, then I found that it likes CONT, so I edited the answer above to fix that. –  Dennis Williamson May 7 '09 at 4:18
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You can stop a process from executing, by sending it a SIGSTOP signal, and then get it to resume executing by sending it a SIGCONT signal.

So you could stop your script by sending is a SIGSTOP:

kill -SIGSTOP <pid>

And then use the at deamon to wake it up by sending it a SIGCONT in the same way.

Presumably, your script will inform at of when it wanted to be woken up before putting itself to sleep.

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I wanted an script that only checked the hours and minutes so I could run the script with the same parameters every day. I don't want to worry about which day will be tomorrow. So I used a different approach.

target="$1.$2"
cur=$(date '+%H.%M')
while test $target != $cur; do
    sleep 59
    cur=$(date '+%H.%M')
done

the parameters to the script are the hours and minutes, so I can write something like:

til 7 45 && mplayer song.ogg

(til is the name of the script)

no more days late at work cause you mistyped the day. cheers!

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timeToWait = $(( $end - $start ))

Beware that "timeToWait" could be a negative number! (for example, if you specify to sleep until "15:57" and now it's "15:58"). So you have to check it to avoid strange message errors:

#!/bin/bash
set -o nounset

### // Sleep until some date/time. 
# // Example: sleepuntil 15:57; kdialog --msgbox "Backup needs to be done."


error() {
  echo "$@" >&2
  exit 1;
}

NAME_PROGRAM=$(basename "$0")

if [[ $# != 1 ]]; then
     error "ERROR: program \"$NAME_PROGRAM\" needs 1 parameter and it has received: $#." 
fi


CURRENT=$(date +%s)
TARGET=$(date -d "$1" +%s)

SECONDS=$(($TARGET - $CURRENT))

if [[ $SECONDS < 0 ]]; then
     error "You need to specify in a different way the moment in which this program has to finish, probably indicating the day and the hour like in this example: $NAME_PROGRAM \"2009/12/30 10:57\"."
fi

sleep "$SECONDS"

# // End of file
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You can calculate the number of seconds between now and the wake-up time and use the existing 'sleep' command.

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You could perhaps use 'at' to send a signal to your script, which sat waiting for that signal.

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Aww man, I was just writing up another answer to this effect. –  SpoonMeiser Mar 14 '09 at 15:12
    
Well, actually, no, mine was slightly different. –  SpoonMeiser Mar 14 '09 at 15:19
    
Yours is cooler. =) –  Kim Reece Mar 14 '09 at 22:46
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Here's something I wrote just now to synchronise multiple test clients:

#!/usr/bin/python
import time
import sys

now = time.time()
mod = float(sys.argv[1])
until = now - now % mod + mod
print "sleeping until", until

while True:
    delta = until - time.time()
    if delta <= 0:
        print "done sleeping ", time.time()
        break
    time.sleep(delta / 2)

This script sleeps until next "rounded" or "sharp" time.

A simple use case is to run ./sleep.py 10; ./test_client1.py in one terminal and ./sleep.py 10; ./test_client2.py in another.

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Where is the connection to my question? –  theomega Jun 11 '13 at 15:11
    
it's easy to extend so that until is set to a specific date/time –  qarma Jun 13 '13 at 12:12
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As this question was asked 4 years ago, this first part concern old bash version:

General method

In order to reduce forks, instead of running date two times, I prefer to use this:

sleep $(($(date -f - +%s- <<< $'tomorrow 21:30\nnow')0))

where tomorrow 21:30 could be replaced by any kind of date and format recognized by date, in the futur.

or better, for reaching next HH:MM meaning today if possible, tomorrow if too late:

sleep $((($(date -f - +%s- <<<$'21:30 tomorrow\nnow')0)%86400))

This work under , and other modern shell, but you have to use:

sleep $(( ( $(printf 'tomorrow 21:30\nnow\n' | date -f - +%s-)0 )%86400 ))

if under lighter shell like or .

New way (no fork)

As my need for this kind of tool has never exceded 24 hours, the following will only concern HH, HH:MM or HH:MM:SS syntax meaning in next 24 hours. ( Anyway if you need more, you could even return to old method using a fork to date. Trying to eliminate one fork in a script running over many days is overkill.)

As new version of bash do offer a printf option to retrieve date, for this new way to sleep until HH:MM whithout using date or any other fork, I've build a little function, there it is:

sleepUntil() {
    local slp tzoff now quiet=false
    [ "$1" = "-q" ] && shift && quiet=true
    local hms=(${1//:/ })
    printf -v now '%(%s)T' -1
    printf -v tzoff '%(%z)T\n' $now
    tzoff=$((0${tzoff:0:1}(3600*${tzoff:1:2}+60*${tzoff:3:2})))
    slp=$(((86400+(now-now%86400)+10#$hms*3600+10#${hms[1]}*60+${hms[2]}-tzoff-now)%86400))
    $quiet || printf 'sleep %ss, -> %(%c)T\n' $slp $((now+slp))
    sleep $slp
}

Than:

sleepUntil 11:11 ; date +"Now, it is: %T"
sleep 3s, -> sam 28 sep 2013 11:11:00 CEST
Now, it is: 11:11:00

sleepUntil -q 11:11:5 ; date +"Now, it is: %T"
Now, it is: 11:11:05

HiRes time under GNU/Linux

Under recent Linux kernel, you will find a variables file named /proc/timer_list where you could read an offset and a now variable, in nanoseconds. So we may compute sleep time to reach the very top desired time.

(I wrote this to generate and track specific events on very big log files, containing thousand line for one second).

mapfile  </proc/timer_list _timer_list
for ((_i=0;_i<${#_timer_list[@]};_i++));do
    [[ ${_timer_list[_i]} =~ ^now ]] && TIMER_LIST_SKIP=$_i
    [[ ${_timer_list[_i]} =~ offset:.*[1-9] ]] && \
    TIMER_LIST_OFFSET=${_timer_list[_i]//[a-z.: ]} && \
     break
done
unset _i _timer_list
readonly TIMER_LIST_OFFSET TIMER_LIST_SKIP

sleepUntilHires() {
    local slp tzoff now quiet=false nsnow nsslp
    [ "$1" = "-q" ] && shift && quiet=true
    local hms=(${1//:/ })
    mapfile -n 1 -s $TIMER_LIST_SKIP nsnow </proc/timer_list
    printf -v now '%(%s)T' -1
    printf -v tzoff '%(%z)T\n' $now
    nsnow=$((${nsnow//[a-z ]}+TIMER_LIST_OFFSET))
    nsslp=$((2000000000-10#${nsnow:${#nsnow}-9}))
    tzoff=$((0${tzoff:0:1}(3600*${tzoff:1:2}+60*${tzoff:3:2})))
    slp=$(( ( 86400 + ( now - now%86400 ) +
            10#$hms*3600+10#${hms[1]}*60+${hms[2]} -
            tzoff - now - 1
        ) % 86400)).${nsslp:1}
    $quiet || printf 'sleep %ss, -> %(%c)T\n' $slp $((now+${slp%.*}+1))
    sleep $slp
}

After defining two read-only variables: TIMER_LIST_OFFSET and TIMER_LIST_SKIP, the function will access very quickly to variable file /proc/timer_list for computing sleep time:

sleepUntilHires 15:03 ;date +%F-%T.%N ;sleep .97;date +%F-%T.%N
sleep 19.632345552s, -> sam 28 sep 2013 15:03:00 CEST
2013-09-28-15:03:00.003471143
2013-09-28-15:03:00.976100517

sleepUntilHires -q 15:04;date -f - +%F-%T.%N < <(echo now;sleep .97;echo now)
2013-09-28-15:04:00.003608002
2013-09-28-15:04:00.974066555

And finaly

sleepUntilHires -q 15:11;date -f - +%F-%T.%N < <(echo now;sleep .97;echo now);sleepUntilHires 15:12;date +%F-%T.%N
2013-09-28-15:11:00.003973984
2013-09-28-15:11:00.974306364
sleep 59.024430416s, -> sam 28 sep 2013 15:12:00 CEST
2013-09-28-15:12:00.003447890

Where, for 1 full minute, there is:

60sec - .97sec (sleep) - 59.024430416sec (sleep) = .005569584

There is less than 1/100th of sec for making a fork to date, read timers and compute sleep time.

sleepUntilHires -q 16:16;date -f - +%F-%T.%N < <(echo now;sleep .97;echo now);sleepUntilHires 16:16:01;date +%F-%T.%N 
2013-09-28-16:16:00.003657646
2013-09-28-16:16:00.974469831
sleep 0.024204370s, -> Sat Sep 28 16:16:01 2013
2013-09-28-16:16:01.003133202
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On Ubuntu 12.04.4 LTS here is the simple bash input which works :

sleep $(expr `date -d "03/21/2014 12:30" +%s` - `date +%s`)
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