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I am having trouble peristing a new object graph to the context with a one-to-many relationship. I am using the Entity Framework 4.1 release, and implementing a Code-First approach. I am using an existing SQL 2008 database and implemented a context derived from DbContext. I have two classes, Person and Address. A person can contain 0 or more Addresses, defined as such.

public class Person 
    {
        public Person()
        {
            Addresses = new List<Address>();
        }

        public int PersonId { get; set; }
        ***Additional Primitive Properties***

        public virtual ICollection<Address> Addresses { get; set; }

    }

public class Address 
    {
        public int AddressId { get; set; }
        public int AddressTypeId { get; set; }
        ***Additional Primitive Properties***

        public int PersonId { get; set; }
        public virtual Person Person { get; set; }
    }

I am trying to create a new instance of Person with two addresses. However, when I add this structure to the context and save, only the first Address in the collection is persisted. The second has the Person navigation property set to null, and is not associated with the Person object, however, the first one in the list is associated.

var person = new Person();

var mailingAddress = new Address() { AddressTypeId = 1 };
person.Addresses.Add(mailingAddress);

var billingAddress = new Address() { AddressTypeId = 2 };
person.Addresses.Add(billingAddress);

context.People.Add(entity);
context.SaveChanges();

It does not throw an exception, but the second item in the Address collection is just not saved.

Does anybody have any good ideas on why only the first would be saved? Thank you.

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2  
You are creating a person but adding entity to the DbSet. A typo? –  Slauma Jun 23 '11 at 22:07
1  
Good observation, but that was just a typo. –  connr Jun 24 '11 at 14:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

After hours of troubleshooting/trial and error, I've solved my problem. My POCO classes are also used in a disconnected environment, where the objects are detached from the context, modified, and then re-attached.

In order to determine which navigation property collection items were affected, I overrode the Equals and GetHashCode methods in the Address class to determine equality. Apparently this affects the ability for EF 4.1 to insert a complete collection of navigation property objects???

Here are the original equality methods which caused the issue:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    Address address = obj as Address;
    if (address == null) return false;
    return address.AddressId == this.AddressId;
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return this.AddressId.GetHashCode();
}

In order to correct the problem, I created a custom equality comparer for the navigation object rather than including it directly in the address class.

public class AddressEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<Address>
{
    public bool Equals(Address address1, Address address2)
    {
        if (address1.AddressId == address2.AddressId)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Address address)
    {
        return address.AddressId.GetHashCode();
    }
}

My context.People.Add method call worked as expected after I made this change.

If anyone knows why overriding the equality methods in the class causes EF 4.1 to only insert the first item in the collection, that would be great information.

share|improve this answer
1  
Interesting. I could reproduce this and the problem occurs only when you override both methods. Can't explain exactly what's wrong, but one critical point is your implementation of GetHashCode imo. The problem is that it doesn't represent the object identity during the object's lifetime because when you create and add the object AddressId is 0 but when you call SaveChanges the Id changes to a value other than 0. Therefore the same object has suddenly another HashCode with your override. That's bad when objects are stored in dictionaries which might internally in EF be the case. –  Slauma Jun 24 '11 at 16:00
    
When confronted with this issue I just added my own auxiliary hash code methods and left the standard .Net one be. One advantage to this is you can actually store these hashes in the DB for fast partial comparisons, like "Are these 20 fields the same between any two of these 30-field rows?" –  Chris Moschini Jul 18 '12 at 15:58
    
That's because EF will handle the foreignkey collection and avoid duplicates by comparing objects in the navigational collection. In your case, all Address instances are new with the Id = 0, and you override the 'equal' method by comparing id, so EF thought your instances are all equal, then strip the others out but the first one.Hope this explains well. –  iNc0ming May 30 '13 at 10:41

As hinted at already, it's because the GetHashCode method is using the ID of all the siblings, which will be 0 at point of comparison by Entity Framework. Comment just that out and you will good to go.

I had the same exact issue and this piece let me to that. I didn't even bother to look at my EntityBase code...it's so old and hasn't changed in forever until now.

So a big thank you for your research!

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Here is another way to attempt to add the code. Worth a shot. This code may not be exact, I typed freehand.

var person = new Person();

person.Addresses.Add(new Address()
{
   AddressTypeId = 1
}),
new Address()
{
   AddressTypeId = 2
});

context.People.Add(entity);
context.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, but I tried and still no dice. It saves the first one in the list, but none of the subsequent items. –  connr Jun 23 '11 at 20:48
    
@connr - Did you place a breakpoint at the context.People.Add(entity) line and make sure that there are two addresses in there before saving the changes. Just something to try. HTH –  webtrifusion Jun 23 '11 at 21:01
    
Yes. The Address collection has two items before and after the save. However after the save, Addresses[0].PersonId = 63 and Addresses[1].PersonId = 0, where 63 is the identity of the newly inserted Person row. It is as if that second Address in the collection is simply being ignored by the context. Thank you. –  connr Jun 23 '11 at 21:13
    
Hey, I hope you have been able to make some headway. Here is a davidhayden.com/blog/dave/archive/2011/04/27/… I found that will hopefully help. –  webtrifusion Jun 23 '11 at 21:43

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