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I have a matrix of unsigned 16's which I am writing out to a text file using

void output() {
ofstream myfile;
myfile.open("output.raw", ios::out | ios::binary);

for(int i=0; i< 100; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j < 100; j++) {
        myfile.write((char*)&r2[i][j], sizeof(uint16_t));
    }
}

}

As this is a ".raw" image file, I believe each uint16 should just be written to the file in succession without any sort of breaks (please correct me if I'm wrong about this).

When I read the data back in, the array does not contain the same values as it did going into the text file. I am reading the data back in with:

for(int i=0; i<NUM_COLS; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j<NUM_ROWS; j++) {
        fread(&q1[j][i], sizeof(uint16_t), 1, fp);

    }
}

Any guesses as to why this is happening?

share|improve this question
    
What is the data type of q1? –  Dave Rager Jun 23 '11 at 20:47
    
uint16_t, which I have typedef'd as a short –  Andrw Jun 23 '11 at 20:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot write floating point data bitwise and read it back as int. You have to convert the float to an integer data type before you write it. Floating point numbers have a totally different binary representation as integer: IEEE_754

for(int i=0; i< 100; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j < 100; j++) {
        uint16_t val = (uint16_t)r2[i][j];
        myfile.write((char*)&val , sizeof(uint16_t));
    }
}

Also you read back the values in the wrong order:

fread(&q1[j][i], sizeof(uint16_t), 1, fp);

should be

fread(&q1[i][j], sizeof(uint16_t), 1, fp); // i and j interchanged
share|improve this answer
    
ah, oops, I was just messing with it to see what it would output. however, the first value (index 0,0) is totally wrong so that cannot be it. –  Andrw Jun 23 '11 at 20:45
    
what values do you write/read for the first number? –  thumbmunkeys Jun 23 '11 at 20:47
    
I am writing 541.9032 and reading 40894. I realized I'm writing a double and reading it in as a uint16_t..but shouldnt it just ignore the extra precision? –  Andrw Jun 23 '11 at 20:51
2  
No, if you are writing it as raw binary data there is no implicit conversion from double to short, it is just writing the data. Plus, a double is represented as 64 bits (8 bytes) so when you are writing it out you are only storing the first two bytes and losing the rest. –  Dave Rager Jun 23 '11 at 20:58
    
thank you dave - I decided to try it after writing that comment and just found out that it worked. Such silly mistakes...thank you! –  Andrw Jun 23 '11 at 21:01

Just for fun, I wrote these generic helpers to write arbitrary 2-dimensional arrays to binary streams:

namespace arraystream
{
    template <class T, size_t M> std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const T (&t)[M])
        { return is.read ((char*) t, M*sizeof(T)); }
    template <class T, size_t M> std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const T (&t)[M])
        { return os.write((char*) t, M*sizeof(T)); }

    template <class T, size_t N, size_t M> std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const T (&tt)[N][M])
        { for (size_t i=0; i<N; i++) is >> tt[i]; return is; }
    template <class T, size_t N, size_t M> std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const T (&tt)[N][M])
        { for (size_t i=0; i<N; i++) os << tt[i]; return os; }
}

You can use them like so in your code:

char     c [23] [5];
float    f [7]  [100];
uint16_t r2[100][100]; // yes that too

std::ofstream ofs("output.raw", std::ios::binary || std::ios::out);
ofs << c << f << r2;
ofs.flush();
ofs.close();

//// 
std::ifstream ifs("output.raw", std::ios::binary || std::ios::in);
ifs >> c >> f >> r2;
ifs.close();

The only minor drawback here is that if you were to declare these in namespace std (or use them all the time), the compiler would try to use these overloads to write std::cout << "hello world" too (that is a char[12] right there). I opted to explicitely use the arraystream namespace where required, see full sample below.

Here is a complete compilable example showing with a checksum hash that the data read back is indeed identical. Boost is not required to use these helpers. I use boost::random to get a set of random data, boost::hash to do the checksum. You could employ any random generator, and perhaps use an external checksum tool instead.

Without further ado:

#include <fstream>
#include <boost/random.hpp>
#include <boost/functional/hash.hpp>

namespace arraystream
{
    template <class T, size_t M> std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const T (&t)[M]) { return is.read ((char*) t, M*sizeof(T)); }
    template <class T, size_t M> std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const T (&t)[M]) { return os.write((char*) t, M*sizeof(T)); }

    template <class T, size_t N, size_t M> std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const T (&tt)[N][M])
        { for (size_t i=0; i<N; i++) is >> tt[i]; return is; }
    template <class T, size_t N, size_t M> std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const T (&tt)[N][M])
        { for (size_t i=0; i<N; i++) os << tt[i]; return os; }
}

template <class T, size_t N, size_t M>
    size_t hash(const T (&aa)[N][M])
{
    size_t seed = 0;
    for (size_t i=0; i<N; i++)
        boost::hash_combine(seed, boost::hash_range(aa[i], aa[i]+M));
    return seed;
}

int main()
{
    uint16_t data[100][100];

    {
        // make some (deterministic noise)
        boost::mt19937 rand(0);
        for (int i=0; i<100; i++) for (int j=0; j<100; j++) data[i][j] = rand();
    }

    {
        // write a file
        std::ofstream ofs;
        ofs.open("output.raw", std::ios::out | std::ios::binary);

        using namespace arraystream;
        ofs << data;
        ofs.flush();
        ofs.close();
    }


    uint16_t clone[100][100];
    {
        // read a file
        std::ifstream ifs;
        ifs.open("output.raw", std::ios::in | std::ios::binary);

        using namespace arraystream;
        ifs >> clone;

        ifs.close();
    }

    std::cout << "data:  " << hash(data)  << std::endl;
    std::cout << "clone: " << hash(clone) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I may need this soon actually. –  Andrw Jun 23 '11 at 22:35

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