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I hear this a lot of times that: "inline functions in C expose internal data structures" and that is one of the reasons some people do not like them.

Can someone please explain, how?

Thanks in advance.

Lets say I have a program code.c and a function func(). I can 1) make func() inline - which will expose whatever I do with my data-structures in code.c 2) I can put func() in a library and provide that as a shared lib (which is not readable - I guess ?? :p) ---- Is this a correct analysis?

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This question doesn't make sense to me. I've never heard anything phrased like that. Perhaps include an example of a very specific context/usage? (Since the question is [perhaps] about inline functions, it is useful to keep in mind "We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of time..." -- Donald Knuth ;-) –  user166390 Jun 23 '11 at 20:52
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3 Answers 3

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It would certainly be more transparent compared to something compiled into a library or object module. That's because you can see the source code, and therefore write code which manipulates the data structures any way you want.

However, for non-line functions for which you have source, I am at a loss how that could be more protected.

There are software corporations which jealously guard their software source code, and only release object modules to be linked with, or shared libraries, or (dread!) .DLLs.

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thanks for your answer. Lets say I have a program code.c and a function func(). I can 1) make func() inline - which will expose whatever I do with my data-structures in code.c 2) I can put func() in a library and provide that as a shared lib (which is not readable - I guess ?? :p) ---- Is this a correct analysis? –  hari Jun 23 '11 at 22:46
    
if possible, can you confirm my understanding? Thanks. :) –  hari Jun 27 '11 at 18:26
    
@hari: Yes, those are correct statements which follow from what I said. –  wallyk Jun 28 '11 at 1:34
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Since you put inline function definitions in a header file (unless used in a single cpp file), which would need to be included by consumers then I guess you are exposing the inner workings of your code.

But, since the alternative is usually macros, I doubt that is a good reason against them.

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...And since the functions themselves should be small in order to actually be inlined, you aren't really exposing that much –  Andrei Jun 23 '11 at 21:00
    
I consider it exposing a lot. You have to make the definitions of any opaque types public, and then (in the case of a library) the definition of opaque types becomes a locked-in part of your library's ABI that can't be changed without bumping version numbers and breaking compatibility. –  R.. Jun 23 '11 at 21:18
    
@R. : I meant it more in the sense of exposing proprietary technology. Now, most things exposed in public headers can't be modified without requiring consumers to recompile. Inline functions are subject to the same requirement. –  Andrei Jun 23 '11 at 21:34
    
I would say if your interface is designed correctly, the implementations of anything declared in a header can be freely changed without requiring applications using the library code to recompile, and likewise that headers should never need to be modified except to add new interfaces. Obviously there will sometimes be exceptions, but it's preferable to avoid making them when possible. –  R.. Jun 23 '11 at 21:37
    
@R. What we have where I work is a set of public headers which contain mostly extern "C" definitions (and although there are additions, the existing definitions rarely change). The inline functions and other implementation details are not part of the public API and can be changed. Arguably, if something is common enough to be made into an inline function it is also stable enough to survive a major version unchanged. –  Andrei Jun 23 '11 at 22:16
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Inline methods expand all method calls in place. So instead of having foo() be a JMP or CALL instruction it just copies the actual instructions of foo() where it was called. If this contains critical data then that would become exposed although inline functions are typically used for short one to two line methods or larger expressions.

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