Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm creating a website and part of the functionality is that a user can create a list. Each user can only have one list, and each list only has one user. Each list also has a bunch of items. Items can be used in multiple lists.

So let's say I have the following tables:

  • Users
  • Lists
  • Items

How can I define which items a list has? Right now I'm storing a string of CSV's in the Lists table, but I doubt that's the best way.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Typically you would have table definitions like:

create table user (
  id int,
  name varchar,
  list_id int, /* optional */
  etc.
)

create table list (
  id int,
  name varchar,
  owner_id int
  etc.
)

create table item (
  id int,
  name varchar,
  etc.
)

create table item_x_list (
  id int,
  list_id int,
  item_id int
)

such that:

user -> list -> item_x_list -> item*

Note that you could skip the list table altogether if you didn't need list-specific data like a name.

share|improve this answer
    
Each user is going to have somewhere around 100 items in their list. Would it be a huge performance problem if item_x_list has thousands of rows? –  Daniel O'Connor Jun 23 '11 at 22:31
2  
Not at all. RDBMS are optimized to handle this kind of "pivot" table efficiently, as long as all of the pertinent id columns are indexed properly. –  Rob Raisch Jun 23 '11 at 22:45
1  
Also if, when adding an item to a new list, the item already exists, you need only update the pivot table to establish a new relationship from the existing item to the new user's list. –  Rob Raisch Jun 23 '11 at 22:47
    
Thanks! What do you think the indexes should be? For item_x_list, I know the id should be a primary key, but what about the others? –  Daniel O'Connor Jun 23 '11 at 22:48
    
All 'id' should be primary keys and the 'WHAT_id' columns also need to be indexed as they are used to stitch the tables together. –  Rob Raisch Jun 23 '11 at 23:07

You'll need another table Lists_Items with two columns:

list_id
item_id
share|improve this answer

I'd structure it like this

Users
UserID (Primary Key)
UserName
ListID (foreign key to Lists.ListID)

Lists
ListID (Primary Key)
ListName

ListsToListItems
ListID (Foreign Key to Lists.ListID)
ListItemID (Foreign Key to ListItems.ListItemID)

ListItems
ListItemID (Primary Key)
ListItemValue

share|improve this answer
    
According to the question, the same list item can belong to several lists. –  Karolis Jun 23 '11 at 21:13
    
Ahh, missed that. corrected answer. –  JohnFx Jun 23 '11 at 21:13

WIth your restriction that a user can have only one list (or none) and each list belonging to exactly one user, I would do:

User
  userid
  username
  Primary Key (userid)

List
  listid
  listname
  Primary Key (listid) 
  Foreign Key (listid) References (User.userid)

ListItem
  listid
  itemid 
  Primary Key (listid, itemid) 
  Foreign Key (listid) References (List.listid)
  Foreign Key (itemid) References (Item.itemid)

Item
  itemid
  description 
  Primary Key (itemid)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.