Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This is so simple yet...

FOLDER='/home/user/.ssh'
SSH="$FOLDER/local-rsync-key.pub"
if [ -f "$SSH" ]; then
...

It looks that Bash considers the '-' as a minus signal and the IF statement always fails... How can I write this variable the right way?

UPDATE: This is another real example:

I am tring to rename files with "-" in front of the filename, for example: "-0001.jpg"

However, everyime I try to run:

for i in *; do mv "$i" "${i//-/}"; done

or:

for i in *; do mv "$i" "${i#*-}"; done

I got this error:

mv: invalid option -- '0'
Try `mv --help' for more information.

Thanks for any light!

share|improve this question
    
It seems to be a duplicate of this quetion. –  Lynch Jul 2 '11 at 16:59

3 Answers 3

You should not have a $ in front of your SSH assignment, that's only needed when you're using the variable. Without that, it works fine, as in the following transcript:

pax> touch abc-xyz

pax> ll a*
-rw-r--r-- 1 pax paxgrp 0 2011-06-24 05:15 abc-xyz

pax> FOLDER=.

pax> $SSH="$FOLDER/abc-xyz"
bash: =./abc-xyz: No such file or directory

pax> SSH="$FOLDER/abc-xyz"

pax> if [ -f "$SSH" ]
...> then
...>     echo yes
...> fi
yes

pax> _
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot the '$' sign by mistake, thank you. –  Roger Jun 23 '11 at 22:46

In bash syntax, when you set a variable just use the variable name:

VAR=value

When you reference the variable, use the $ prefix:

echo $VAR

Your code has a stray dollar sign prefix where you are trying to set the SSH variable. The dashes inside the variable should be no problem.

share|improve this answer
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer is to use "--" (indicating no more options) after "mv" or "./" before the name of the file (indicating it is about a file). For example:

for i in *; do mv -- "$i" "${i#*-}"; done

or:

for i in *; do mv -- "$i" "./${i#*-}"; done
share|improve this answer
    
It's worth noting that this works for pretty much any Linux tool ever. find is one notable exception. –  l0b0 Jul 5 '11 at 14:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.