Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        int i = 0;
        whatever x = new whatever(i);
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        i = 1;
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    class whatever
    {
       public whatever(object variable)
       {
           this.variable = () => variable.ToString();
       }

       private Func<string> variable;
       public string data;

       public override string ToString()
       {
           data = variable();
           return data;
       }
}

Output:

0
0

what I want to do is get updated i's value.

share|improve this question
    
What's the question? –  dizzwave Jun 23 '11 at 22:01
    
what I want to do is get updated i's value. –  haxxoromer Jun 23 '11 at 22:02
1  
i is a value type so it will not get updated when you use the Console.WriteLine(x) for second time. you need to instantiate Whatever again with the new vale of i. –  Shuhel Ahmed Jun 23 '11 at 22:05
    
@Shuhel Thats what I do not want. I want that class to track i's updated variable. –  haxxoromer Jun 23 '11 at 22:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe the problem is that delegate is bound to boxed integer data. This is why you change your int and delegate evaluates to old boxed data.

Try it with constructor that takes an int.

But, yes it's true that ints are pased by value, so this will not work. Pass delegate to ctor.

class Program
{
        static void Main()
        {
            int i = 0;
        whatever x = new whatever(() => i.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        i = 1;
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    class whatever
    {
        public whatever(Func<string> someFunc)
        {
            this.variable = someFunc;
        }

        private Func<string> variable;
        public string data;

        public override string ToString()
        {
            data = variable();
            return data;
        }
    }
 }

Output: 0 1

Or as other have indicated:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var myRefType = new MyRefType();
        myRefType.MyInt = 0;

        var x = new whatever(myRefType);
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        myRefType.MyInt = 1;

        Console.WriteLine(x);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    class whatever
    {
        public whatever(MyRefType myRefType)
        {
            this.variable = () => myRefType.MyInt.ToString();
        }

        private Func<string> variable;

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return variable();
        }
    }

    class MyRefType
    {
        public int MyInt { get; set; }
    }
}

Outputs: 0 1

share|improve this answer
    
Yes yes yes, So I have to write that () => etc. long thing everytime , Okay thats the solution but Can't we do by just new whatever(i) ? –  haxxoromer Jun 23 '11 at 22:17
    
Lambda expressions cannot access the ref or out parameters of an outer scope. This means any out or ref variables that were defined as part of the containing method are off-limits for use inside the body of the lambda expression. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/orm-9780596516109-03-09.aspx And if you do not use ref, it is a value type, and it is copied. –  Petar Repac Jun 23 '11 at 22:23

If you want to capture the local variable then you've put the lambda in the wrong place. The lambda has to go where it can be closed over the outer variable you want to capture.

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        int i = 0;
        var x = new Whatever<int>(()=>i);
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        i = 1;
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

class Whatever<T>
{
   private Func<T> variable;
   public Whatever(Func<T> func)
   {
       this.variable= func;
   }
   public override string ToString()
   {
       return this.variable().ToString();
   }
}

Does that make sense? See, the lambda has to be where the "i" is declared, so that "i" is an outer variable of the lambda and therefore the lambda sees changes to it.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I should look for lamdas and delegate things to understand clearly that concept. –  haxxoromer Jun 23 '11 at 22:39
    
@user810576: Basically what this does is what other's have suggested: the compiler generates a class for you that has an int field. The local variable is turned into a reference to that field. When the delegate is invoked, it looks up the field. We only have two ways of passing around variables such that they can hang around indefinitely: arrays and fields of classes. ("ref" parameters also allow you to pass around variables, but the refs cannot live for long.) Any solution in which you are using the same variable in multiple places will typically involve generating a field somehow. –  Eric Lippert Jun 23 '11 at 22:55
    
@user810576: This is a subject where C# in Depth is EXTREMELY valuable for understanding (that's not to say the rest of the book is not valuable, just this is one of the places where it REALLY shines). See chapter five, and look at the section on captured variables. –  Jason Jun 23 '11 at 23:05

i is an integer (value type), which is passed by value - a copy of the value is passed to the whatever constructor. When you change its value on the Main method, it doesn't change what has been already passed to the class. So you can't get the updated value on whatever.

If you have an object which holds a field of an integer value, and then pass that object to whatever, then changes to that field will be reflected on the class.

share|improve this answer
    
what DO I have to do? –  haxxoromer Jun 23 '11 at 22:04
1  
Just to clarify, you need to use an object of a reference type that has an integer field - i.e. an instance of a class. You can't wrap the integer in a struct, since you would end up with the same unwanted result. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Jun 23 '11 at 22:08

Integers are of value type, not reference type.

share|improve this answer

int is value type, meaning its value is copied each time you use it and not its reference. The best way to make this work is make reference type around int:

class IntRef
{
    public int Val;
}

You will need to always use IntRef.Val and passing the IntVal itself around will retain the reference.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.