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I have an if statement that looks as follows:

int count=0;
string Check;

if ((count==4 && Check!="-s")||(count==4 && Check!="-S"))

If count equals 4 and Check equals "-s" or "-S" it still enters this if statement because of the count == 4. It totally seems to ignore the second part. Is there something I'm doing wrong?

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For compare strings in c++, you must use the compare() funcion like this: cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/compare – JLledo Jun 23 '11 at 22:14
2  
@Joan Lledó: The C++ std::string class overloads the == operator so that it "magically" works in this case. – In silico Jun 23 '11 at 22:16
    
Try: if(count==4 && Check!="-s" && Check!="-S") – Tom Jun 23 '11 at 22:17
1  
You have the answer in your question: "if count equals 4 and Check equals -s or -S". This is how you should have written the if-statement. – Sani Huttunen Jun 23 '11 at 22:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, if Check is "-S", then it will not even check the second pair of conditions, because you check with ||. The same holds true for the opposite case. If one is false, the other is true. Replace that with a &&.

int count = 4;
string Check = "-S";

if( (count == 4 && // count is 4, alright.
     Check != "-s") || // Check is "-S", alright I'm done thanks to || (OR)
    (count == 4 &&
     Check != "-S") )
{
  // ...
}

int count = 4;
string Check = "-s";

if( (count == 4 && // count is 4, alright.
     Check != "-s") || // Check is "-S", time to check the other condition pair...
    (count == 4 && // count is 4, alright.
     Check != "-S") ) // Check is "-s", which is different from "-S", perfect.
{
  // ...
}

Now the corrected version:

int count = 4;
string Check = "-S";

if( (count == 4 && // count is 4, alright.
     Check != "-s") && // Check is "-S", different from "-s", now on to the other condition!
    (count == 4 && // count is 4, alright.
     Check != "-S") ) // Check is "-S"... oh dang! No executed code for you.
{
  // ...
}
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It's always going to be the case that either Check!="-s" or Check!="-S". Hence, your if statement is equivalent to if (count==4).

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If count == 4 and Check == "-s", then the expression to the right of the || is true. If count == 4 and Check == "-S", then the expression to the left of the || is true. So you have true or true which is true. Thus, your if-block is executed.

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The right statement is:

if(count==4 && (Check != "-s" || Check!="-S"))

The statement that you wrote is true if you have count = 4 and Check = "-S" because then the first part of the OR is true.

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This also fails because the first part of the OR is true. – Ravi Jun 23 '11 at 22:30
    
At least one part of the OR is always true. – Bo Persson Jun 23 '11 at 22:38
    
Since @vrxacs used Check="-S" in his example, I meant that would cause the first part of the OR to be true. – Ravi Jun 23 '11 at 22:44

Might be more clear to use:

if (count==4 && Check!="-s" && Check!="-S")
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You should use !strcmp(Check, "-s") and !strcmp(Check, "-S") instead of !=.

If you use == you compare the pointers and that is no what you want. The pointers will always be different thus your second argument will always be true.

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Uh, that's if you're dealing with char*, not with the type string which is part of <string> in c++ which has operator== overloaded – lccarrasco Jun 23 '11 at 22:18

You want to enter the if body if and only if Check is != from either -s or -S and count is = 4 right?

if ( (Check!="-s" && Check!="-S") && count==4 ) 

should work.

or

if ( Check.tolower() !="-s" && count==4 ) 

should work.

(Do not remember the name of the function to lowercase a string, you have got to look it up)

Hope this help.

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