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I am writing a function to plot data. I would like to specify a nice round number for the y-axis max that is greater than the max of the dataset.

Specifically, I would like a function foo that performs the following:

foo(4) == 5
foo(6.1) == 10 #maybe 7 would be better
foo(30.1) == 40
foo(100.1) == 110 

I have gotten as far as

foo <- function(x) ceiling(max(x)/10)*10

For the case of nearest 10, 100, but this does not work for arbitrary X.

Is there a better way to do this in R?

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The R default behavior when plotting is to set the plot limits ~4% beyond the range of the data in each direction. If this isn't satisfying to you maybe just write something that goes out by a higher or lower %? –  joran Jun 23 '11 at 22:39
    
@joran thanks for the info, but I want multiple plots that all have the same axis limits and ticks and I am not sure how this helps. –  Abe Jun 23 '11 at 22:43
    
Well, I'm sort of groping in the dark here, since I don't know all the background. Your foo will round up to the nearest X if you just add another parameter X and replace both 10's with X. Or you could use faceting. –  joran Jun 23 '11 at 22:50
4  
Are you looking for ?pretty ? –  hadley Jun 24 '11 at 0:24
    
Why is foo(4)==5 and not 10? –  James Jun 24 '11 at 13:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

If you just want to round up to the nearest power of 10, then just define:

roundUp <- function(x) 10^ceiling(log10(x))

This actually also works when x is a vector:

> roundUp(c(0.0023, 3.99, 10, 1003))
[1] 1e-02 1e+01 1e+01 1e+04

..but if you want to round to a "nice" number you first need to define what a "nice" number is. The following lets up define "nice" as a vector with nice base values from 1 to 10. The default is set to the even numbers plus 5.

roundUpNice <- function(x, nice=c(1,2,4,5,6,8,10)) {
    if(length(x) != 1) stop("'x' must be of length 1")
    10^floor(log10(x)) * nice[[which(x <= 10^floor(log10(x)) * nice)[[1]]]]
}

The above doesn't work when x is a vector - too late in the evening right now :)

> roundUpNice(0.0322)
[1] 0.04
> roundUpNice(3.22)
[1] 4
> roundUpNice(32.2)
[1] 40
> roundUpNice(42.2)
[1] 50
> roundUpNice(422.2)
[1] 500

[[EDIT]]

If the question is how to round to a specified nearest value (like 10 or 100), then James answer seems most appropriate. My version lets you to take any value and automatically round it to a reasonably "nice" value. Some other good choices of the "nice" vector above are: 1:10, c(1,5,10), seq(1, 10, 0.1)

If you have a range of values in your plot, for example [3996.225, 40001.893] then the automatic way should take into account both the size of the range and the magnitude of the numbers. And as noted by Hadley, the pretty() function might be what you want.

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Vectorize(roundUpNice) is quite fast =) +1 Anyway. –  mbq Jun 24 '11 at 9:40

The plyr library has a function round_any that is pretty generic to do all kinds of rounding. For example

library(plyr)
round_any(132.1, 10)               # returns 130
round_any(132.1, 10, f = ceiling)  # returns 140
round_any(132.1, 5, f = ceiling)   # returns 135
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How about:

roundUp <- function(x,to=10)
{
  to*(x%/%to + as.logical(x%%to))
}

Which gives:

> roundUp(c(4,6.1,30.1,100.1))
[1]  10  10  40 110
> roundUp(4,5)
[1] 5
> roundUp(12,7)
[1] 14
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if I am right, the OP wants roundUp(4, to=1) return 5 –  daroczig Jun 24 '11 at 18:56
1  
@daroczig The question is a little confusing, I wrote this focusing on the "arbitrary X" requirement, but clearly all the expected values could not be produce by "a single round up to the nearest X" solution. It seems that the OP wants to produce values for an axis, so pretty is probably the best option. –  James Jun 25 '11 at 15:53
    
You are right @James, thanks for the feedback and sorry to disturb :) –  daroczig Jun 25 '11 at 19:50
    
@daroczig No probs –  James Jun 26 '11 at 16:24

I think your code just works great with a small modification:

foo <- function(x, round=10) ceiling(max(x+10^-9)/round + 1/round)*round

And your examples run:

> foo(4, round=1) == 5
[1] TRUE
> foo(6.1) == 10            #maybe 7 would be better
[1] TRUE
> foo(6.1, round=1) == 7    # you got 7
[1] TRUE
> foo(30.1) == 40
[1] TRUE
> foo(100.1) == 110
[1] TRUE
> # ALL in one:
> foo(c(4, 6.1, 30.1, 100))
[1] 110
> foo(c(4, 6.1, 30.1, 100), round=10)
[1] 110
> foo(c(4, 6.1, 30.1, 100), round=2.3)
[1] 101.2

I altered your function in two way:

  • added second argument (for your specified X )
  • added a small value (=1e-09, feel free to modify!) to the max(x) if you want a bigger number
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The round function in R assigns special meaning to the digits parameter if it is negative.

round(x, digits = 0)

Rounding to a negative number of digits means rounding to a power of ten, so for example round(x, digits = -2) rounds to the nearest hundred.

This means a function like the following gets pretty close to what you are asking for.

foo <- function(x)
{
    round(x+5,-1)
}

The output looks like the following

foo(4)
[1] 10
foo(6.1)
[1] 10
foo(30.1)
[1] 40
foo(100.1)
[1] 110
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