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I'm trying to sort a list of products by their price.

The result set needs to list products by price from low to high by the column "LowestPrice". However, this column is nullable.

I can sort the list in descending order like so:

var products = from p in _context.Products
   where p.ProductTypeId == 1
   orderby p.LowestPrice.HasValue descending
   orderby p.LowestPrice descending
   select p;

// returns:    102, 101, 100, null, null

however I can't figure out how to sort this in ascending order

// i'd like: 100, 101, 102, null, null
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1  
orderby p.LowestPrice ?? Int.MaxValue; is a simple way. –  PostMan Jun 23 '11 at 22:44
2  
@PostMan: Yes, it's simple, it achieves the right result, but OrderByDescending, ThenBy is clearer. –  Jason Jun 23 '11 at 23:30
    
@Jason, yeah I didn't know the syntax for the orderby, and got side tracked looking for it :) –  PostMan Jun 24 '11 at 1:37
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5 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Try putting both columns in the same orderby.

orderby p.LowestPrice.HasValue descending, p.LowestPrice

Otherwise each orderby is a separate operation on the collection re-ordering it each time.

This should order the ones with a with a value first, "then" the order of the value.

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cheers. so simple, i feel like an idiot :P –  sf. Jun 23 '11 at 22:50
1  
Common mistake, people do the same with Lamda Syntax - using .OrderBy twice instead of .ThenBy. –  DaveShaw Jun 23 '11 at 22:51
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It really helps to understand the LINQ query syntax and how it is translated to LINQ method calls.

It turns out that

var products = from p in _context.Products
               where p.ProductTypeId == 1
               orderby p.LowestPrice.HasValue descending
               orderby p.LowestPrice descending
               select p;

will be translated by the compiler to

var products = _context.Products
                       .Where(p => p.ProductTypeId == 1)
                       .OrderByDescending(p => p.LowestPrice.HasValue)
                       .OrderByDescending(p => p.LowestPrice)
                       .Select(p => p);

This is emphatically not what you want. This sorts by Product.LowestPrice.HasValue in descending order and then re-sorts the entire collection by Product.LowestPrice in descending order.

What you want is

var products = _context.Products
                       .Where(p => p.ProductTypeId == 1)
                       .OrderByDescending(p => p.LowestPrice.HasValue)
                       .ThenBy(p => p.LowestPrice)
                       .Select(p => p);

which you can obtain using the query syntax by

var products = from p in _context.Products
               where p.ProductTypeId == 1
               orderby p.LowestPrice.HasValue descending,
                       p.LowestPrice
               select p;

For details of the translations from query syntax to method calls, see the language specification. Seriously. Read it.

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2  
+1 or just ... don't write the LINQ query syntax :) Good explanation nonetheless –  sehe Jun 23 '11 at 23:12
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I have another option in this situation. My list is objList, and I have to order but nulls must be in the end. my decision:

var newList = objList.Where(m=>m.Column != null)
                     .OrderBy(m => m.Column)
                     .Concat(objList.where(m=>m.Column == null));
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my decision:

Array = _context.Products.OrderByDescending(p => p.Val ?? float.MinValue)
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This is what I came up with because I am using extension methods and also my item is a string, thus no .HasValue:

.OrderBy(f => f.SomeString == null).ThenBy(f => f.SomeString)

This works with LINQ 2 objects in memory. I did not test it with EF or any DB ORM.

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