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#include<iostream.h>
void main()
{
    cout<<"Love";
}

The question is how can we change the output of this program into "I Love You" without making any change in main().

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1  
Change the question title! –  Tim Matthews Mar 14 '09 at 16:17
    
Even if this is cheating on homework, it's actually a question, you can learn something from, as demonstrated by litb's answer. –  Hanno Fietz Mar 14 '09 at 16:38
3  
@Hanno: A great answer does not necessarily imply a great question. –  LeakyCode Mar 14 '09 at 16:38
1  
@Mehrdad: The question doesn't need to be great (or even good) to be proper, though. I'm leaning toward re-opening this. Only, I'd prefer to fix it first, and I can't quite see the way... –  dmckee Mar 14 '09 at 16:41
    
@dmckee: Agreed. But I don't think the credit of litb's awesome answer should be given to the question at all. –  LeakyCode Mar 14 '09 at 16:44
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closed as not a real question by Lightness Races in Orbit, alxx, Anders R. Bystrup, BЈовић, Romain Francois Jan 28 '13 at 12:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

15 Answers

Ok, fixing your main function and iostream.h ... This is the way

#include <iostream>

// to make sure std::cout is constructed when we use it
// before main was called - thxx to @chappar
std::ios_base::Init stream_initializer;

struct caller {
    caller() { std::cout << "I "; }
    ~caller() { std::cout << " You"; }
} c;

// ohh well, for the br0ken main function
using std::cout;

int main()
{
    cout<<"Love";
}

I figured i should explain why that works. The code defines a structure that has a constructor and a destructor. The constructor is run when you create an object of the struct and the destructor is run when that object is destroyed. Now, at the end of a struct definition, you can put declarators that will have the type caller.

So, what we did above is creating an object called c which is constructed (and the constructor called) at program start - even before main is run. And when the program terminates, the object is destroyed and the destructor is run. In between, main printed "Love".

That pattern actually is very well known by the term RAII which usually claims some resource in the constructor and releases it again in the destructor call.

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Very instructive, 'ya Smart ass. –  dmckee Mar 14 '09 at 16:25
    
That is quite clever. +1! –  John Feminella Mar 14 '09 at 16:25
1  
@Binu: But do you why it works? If you do, you've learned something significant about c++... –  dmckee Mar 14 '09 at 16:31
4  
@litb, The answer may not work in all the time. Is there any guarantee that cout will be constructed before your caller object? Does C++ standard mandates that cout, cin will be created before all the user global objects? –  chappar Mar 14 '09 at 18:11
1  
Thank you so much, the_drow :) I've read some days ago that C++1x guarantees that cout and friends are constructed after #include <iostream> is included. So we don't need the stream_initializer then anymore. Until that time, i'll keep it in, of course :P –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 30 '09 at 17:38
show 20 more comments
#include <iostream>
class tclass
{
  public:
    void operator <<(char *s)
    {
          std::cout<<"I"<<s<<"You"<<std::endl;
    }
};

tclass cout;

int main()
{
  cout<<"love";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty clever too. –  James McMahon Mar 14 '09 at 19:57
    
very clever, no need of doing it extraordinary way, do it the simple way, thats what you have done. this is as good as litb's answer if not as cool. very well done indeed! –  Real Red. Mar 15 '09 at 6:40
    
Actually, it yields incorrect output. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '13 at 11:17
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Not as elegant as litb's, but it works

#include <iostream> 
#include <cstdio> 
#include <sstream> 

#define cout     printf("I love you\n"); std::ostringstream os; os 

int main() 
{ 
    cout << "love"; 
}

Of course, you don't need to use a stringstream, you could use any class with operator<<.

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Cheap but effective. –  Tyler McHenry May 29 '09 at 22:09
1  
Hackish :) Still nice. –  the_drow May 30 '09 at 17:07
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Like this:

#include <iostream>
int main() {
   std::cout << "I Love You" << std::endl;
   return 0;
}

/*
#include<iostream.h>
void main()
{
    cout<<"Love";
}
*/

This way, you haven't changed anything in the main. :-p

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What i meant is #include <iostream> int main() { std::cout << "Love"; return 0; } now.. change the output into I Love You without making any change in main(). –  Binu Mar 14 '09 at 16:25
3  
bad answer, not funny at all. if a 2 or 3 digit reputation holder posts this answer he'd get a -10 for it. thats SO double standard for you! :-) –  Real Red. Mar 15 '09 at 6:37
    
@RealRed.: [citation required] –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '13 at 11:18
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Not as elegant as litb's, but an alternative:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int foo()
{
    cout << "I Love You" << endl;
    return cout.rdbuf(0);
}
int i = foo();

int main()
{
    cout << "Love" << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
what does rdbuf(0) do? does your program print "Love" after printing "I Love You"? If it does then, could we possibly terminate the program inside foo() without ever having to execute main() at all? –  chappar Mar 14 '09 at 18:36
1  
It hides the output of "Love" by redirecting cout to nothing. It only prints "I Love You". –  CTT Mar 14 '09 at 20:18
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We can do it like this too:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

int fnfoo(int inum){
   cout << "I Love You" << endl;
   return (exit(0),inum);
}

int dummy = fnfoo(5);

int main()
{
   cout << "Love" << endl;
}

Simple and works perfectly ;)

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That code has no using std but anyway it would require writing your own wrapper around cout and removing the using std if there was and replace with using mystd where the wrapper is defined.

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I guess you could write an operator<< that added "I" before and "You" after the current output.

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#include <iostream> #include <cstdio> #include <sstream> using namespace std; #define cout printf("I love you"); ostringstream os; os /*newline*/ int main() { cout << "love"; } –  rlbond Mar 14 '09 at 16:32
    
@rlbond erm, wouldn't that crash horribly because you're then doing printf(); << "love"; ? =D –  Ed Woodcock Mar 14 '09 at 17:26
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Shouldn't your main function return an int? You're either going to need to change the method, or write another program that this one pipes into, but that's the most round about way to change a simple string...

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In C++ main() is an special function, and the only one allowed by the standard to declare a return type and not actually return anything (in which case the standard says that the compiler will perform as if a 0 was returned by the user) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 7 '09 at 20:00
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: It is, nonetheless, required to have a return type of int. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '13 at 11:19
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The lesson is that C++ can execute code before and after main() through static constructors/destructors, eg. the code posted by litb.

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So your answer is "go look at that other answer over there"? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '13 at 11:19
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Assuming this was a class assignment, I would bet the idea was that you could rewrite iostream.h, since C++ doesn't treat it as special (for certain definitions of "special").

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If fact the standard does treat treat iostream (and all other standard headers) differently. The compiler is allowed to just inject the definitions in the code without actually including the header file. Then again, even if compilers are allowed to do it, most current implementations do not. Anyway, the use of angle brackets has concrete implications (with some compilers it will search for the files first in compiler and system wide directories, then locally), then again (again) other compilers just treat angle brackets and double quotes equally. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 7 '09 at 19:59
    
In other words "for certain definitions of 'special'." –  Max Lybbert Sep 8 '09 at 17:48
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: But not iostream.h, which is not a part of the library. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '13 at 11:20
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You need to change the main, by either calling another function or by changing the text. Since main() is the main output of your program

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-1 because this is not true. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '13 at 11:20
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Can you be a little more precise?

You want the output of that piece of code to be "I love you" instead of "Love"?

Edit: I don't think you can't without changing at least one line of code in main(). You can either change from cout<<"Love" to cout<<"I love you" or just add a function that outputs that specific line.

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yes..i need that output as you said..But the only condition is that there won't make even a single line code change in main(). –  Binu Mar 14 '09 at 16:22
    
Eh, you could define your own variable 'cout' in the global namespace, and have it print "I love you" to std::cout. :) –  jalf Mar 14 '09 at 16:37
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I'm really surprised that noone suggested #define "Love" "I love you"... :)

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3  
Probably because you can't. –  GManNickG Aug 25 '10 at 8:20
    
This will not work since "Love" is a string and not an identifier or a symbolic name. –  naivnomore Aug 25 '10 at 20:19
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Steve Guidi Aug 26 '12 at 22:04
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It seems you're saying you don't want code changes, but you want different behaviour. Since the behavior you want cannot be achieved by magic you have two real solutions:

  1. Either abuse the pre-processor/compiler, or the code as seen above in litb's creative solution.
  2. Compile the code as-is so that it prints "Love", but then edit the generated binary.

Me? I used to break copy protection so I'd go the latter route. Build the program from the source you have but then edit the binary so that it behaves how you prefer.

Given the roundabout nature of this solution though I'd strongly wonder at your motivation. It seems like such a pointless question to ask unless you don't understand compilers, or have sinister motivation...

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protected by Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '13 at 11:21

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