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My database table has the following columns: A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6

I have to update these records and shift the values left whenever I come across a null column. The purpose is not to have null values between the columns that have a value starting from left. For example if:

A1 = NULL , A2 = 1 , A3 = 4, A4 = 5, A5 = 9, A6 = 8

I have to shift the values left so the result will be:

A1 = 1, A2 = 4 , A3 = 5, A4 = 9, A5 = 8, A6 = NULL

So far I have come up with the following query but it is slow. Let me know if you can tweak the query to make it faster. One more thing, What if I do this in c#? Will it be faster if I loop through the Datarows there and update each row?

UPDATE myTable SET
    A5 = A6,
    A6 = NULL
WHERE (A5 IS NULL) AND (NOT A6 IS NULL)

UPDATE myTable SET
    A4 = A5,
    A5 = A6
WHERE (A4 IS NULL) AND (NOT A5 IS NULL)

UPDATE myTable SET
    A3 = A4,
    A4 = A5,
    A5 = A6
WHERE (A3 IS NULL) AND (NOT A4 IS NULL)

UPDATE myTable SET
    A2 = A3,
    A3 = A4,
    A4 = A5,
    A5 = A6
WHERE (A2 IS NULL) AND (NOT A3 IS NULL)

UPDATE myTable SET
    A1 = A2,
    A2 = A3,
    A3 = A4,
    A4 = A5,
    A5 = A6
WHERE (A1 IS NULL) AND (NOT A2 IS NULL)
share|improve this question
3  
Any reason why you're not just adding these on as a related table? You're violating normal forms by doing it this way... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – Lucent Fox Jun 23 '11 at 23:18
3  
A poor data model, indeed. – duffymo Jun 23 '11 at 23:19
    
There are other columns too in this table and I am not able to change the design. I will have to find a way to do this without changing the design. it's an old system with poor Data model. – Sev Jun 23 '11 at 23:21
    
What if you declared variables for each column and then use IF statements. That should get you down to one SELECT and one UPDATE. I am unsure if the compiler is performing 5 SELECTs and then 1 UPDATE with your current code. – cgatian Jun 23 '11 at 23:33

Given that [anything] + NULL + [anything] is null how about;

declare @t table(A1 int, A2 int, A3 int, A4 int, A5 int, A6 int)
insert @t values 
   (NULL, 2 , 3, 4, 5, 6),
   (1, NULL, 3, 4, 5, 6),
   (1, 2, NULL, 4, 5, 6),
   (1, 2, 3, NULL, 5, 6),
   (1, 2, 3, 4, NULL, 6),
   (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, NULL),
   (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

update @t
  set A1 = coalesce(A1, A2),
  A2 = case when A1 + A2                is null then A3 else A2 end,
  A3 = case when A1 + A2 + A3           is null then A4 else A3 end,
  A4 = case when A1 + A2 + A3 + A4      is null then A5 else A4 end,
  A5 = case when A1 + A2 + A3 + A4 + A5 is null then A6 else A5 end,
  A6 = case when A1 + A2 + A3 + A4 + A5 is null then null else A6 end
from @t

select * from @t


A1  A2  A3  A4  A5  A6
2   3   4   5   6   NULL
1   3   4   5   6   NULL
1   2   4   5   6   NULL
1   2   3   5   6   NULL
1   2   3   4   6   NULL
1   2   3   4   5   NULL
1   2   3   4   5   6
share|improve this answer
    
And what happens if both A1 and A2 are NULL ? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jun 24 '11 at 0:56

How about using coalesce in a statement something like this:

update mytable
set a1 = coalesce(a1,a2,a3,a4,a5,a6),
    a2=coalesce(a2,a3,a4,a5,a6), 
    a3=coalesce(a3,a4,a5,a6), 
    a4=coalesce(a4,a5,a6), 
    a5=coalesce(a5,a6)
share|improve this answer
    
no this solution wont work, since it copies the values – Sev Jun 24 '11 at 15:53
    
What do you mean it won't work because it copies the values? This wasn't meant to be the complete solution, just sample approach. You could add WHERE's and/or break it up into several more specialized queries but I think coalesce will work. – JNappi Jun 24 '11 at 17:22
    
Let me try it today, I will let you know of the results. So far the most useful answer is yours – Sev Jun 24 '11 at 19:35

If you have no control over the code or the database design, I would recommend solving this problem using a trigger.

Set up an INSERT, UPDATE trigger that will specifically only look at the rows that have just been changed. That way you're not running an update statement on data that has already been checked for consistency. Less rows to check/update means better performance.

You can narrow it down to the rows that have been touched by looking at the virtual inserted and deleted tables.

Once your trigger is in place either touch all of the existing rows (to fire the trigger on them) or run your original script to make sure that everything is in a consistent state.

share|improve this answer

If not that, have you tried adding covering indexes on all of your columns? Try adding indexes in the following way. This is so that it can find the rows that need updating faster, the covering index is so that it doesn't have to do a bookmark lookup to get the next value it needs.

A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6
A2, A3, A4, A5, A6
A3, A4, A5, A6
A4, A5, A6
A5, A6
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know how to add the covering index. – Sev Jun 24 '11 at 0:14
    
Wouldn't adding new indexes make the update SLOWER since those would also need to be updated in each statement? Accessing the rows more quickly is nice, but indexes have an increased update cost as well. – Chris Smith Jun 24 '11 at 3:10

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