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With given polygon on a plane and circle with center in P(0,0) and radius R. How to calculate area of polygon placed in circle? Some time ago i was trying to solve very similar problem and today i met this problem again... Just can't figure out the method. I was thinking about some divide and conquer solution, which runs in O(n log n), where n is number of verticles forming polygon, but without any success... Thanks for any hints. P.S this is not homework, we have holiday :)

Chris

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What does the circle matter? I'd imagine that you could break the polygon down into triangles, and then compute the area of each triangle. –  aroth Jun 23 '11 at 23:47
    
Didn't think about that ! But maybe stupid question.... but how calculate it for each triangle? Sorry for lameish questions, but i'm poor at geometry. –  Chris Jun 24 '11 at 7:57
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Well the formula for the area of a triangle is (width * height) / 2. So I would think that you need to pick any two points in the triangle and compute the distance between them. That will give you the width. Then you can use the third vertex to work out the height. Or you can use any of a number of different algorithms described here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle#Computing_the_area_of_a_triangle –  aroth Jun 24 '11 at 10:44
    
by "Placed inside circle" what do you mean? Do you mean that the polygon is regular and circumscribed by the circle? Or do you mean the circle and polygon overlap in some way and you want to calculate the area of the polygon which lies inside the circle's bounds? –  Atreys Aug 4 '11 at 22:37
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1 Answer

I wanted to write an answer, but since I'm on my iPhone, I drew you one instead:

MASTERPIECE

Basically, it boils down to a bunch of triangles and circle segments. You know how to calculate those areas, so you just have to sum the areas of those which are to be included (see figure).

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That picture, it hurt a little to gaze upon. –  Atreys Aug 4 '11 at 22:34
    
As Confucius once said, "So does your face." –  LaC Aug 4 '11 at 22:38
    
He might just say 因此,沒有你的臉 –  Atreys Aug 4 '11 at 22:42
    
I admit it, my quote-faking is as shoddy as my drawing. You win this time, Atreeeeeeeys! –  LaC Aug 4 '11 at 22:59
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