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I have developed this method which compares 2 (or more) arrays, and returns whatever you wish as result.

This is done by converting the arrays to strings then comparing them, then converting back the result. (could also be used for other stuff) instead of just doing deep iterations and recursions to do the same thing..

example:

var arr1 = [[8,0,3,0,0,7,0,9,0],[0,9,0,0,3,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,4,0,6],[0,0,0,0,3,9,7,6,0],[9,6,0,5,0,7,0,8,1],[0,7,4,6,8,0,0,0,0],[5,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,5,0,0,7,0],[0,6,0,7,0,0,1,0,8]];
var arr2 = [[8,7,3,0,0,7,0,9,0],[0,9,0,0,3,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,4,0,6],[0,0,0,0,3,9,7,6,0],[9,6,0,5,0,7,0,8,1],[0,6,4,6,8,0,0,0,0],[5,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,5,0,3,7,0],[1,6,0,7,0,0,1,0,8]];

arr1 = JSON.stringify( arr1 );
arr2 = JSON.stringify( arr2 );
var temp = ''; // this object will hold the XOR result

console.log( arr1 );
console.log( arr2 );

for( var i=0; i < arr1.length; i++ ){
    if( arr1[i] == '[' || arr1[i] == ']' || arr1[i] == ',' )
        temp += arr1[i];
    else
        temp += arr1[i] == arr2[i] ? 0 : 1;
}

console.log( temp );

what are your thoughts of this method? better for performance I believe.

share|improve this question
    
Should this question be on codereview.stackexchange.com ? –  Joey Adams Jun 24 '11 at 1:05
    
How are you going to handle 16x16 Sudoku boards? –  Joey Adams Jun 24 '11 at 1:23
    
I think this code is very small and super readable, I can also refactor it a bit –  vsync Jun 24 '11 at 7:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's a version that works for any type of object:

var arr1 = [[8,0,3,0,0,7,0,9,0],[0,9,0,0,3,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,4,0,6],[0,0,0,0,3,9,7,6,0],[9,6,0,5,0,7,0,8,1],[0,7,4,6,8,0,0,0,0],[5,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,5,0,0,7,0],[0,6,0,7,0,0,1,0,8]];
var arr2 = [[8,0,3,0,0,7,0,9,0],[0,9,0,0,3,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,4,0,6],[0,0,0,0,3,9,7,6,0],[9,6,0,5,0,7,0,8,1],[0,7,4,6,8,0,0,0,0],[5,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,5,0,0,7,0],[0,6,0,7,0,0,1,0,8]];

alert(isEqual(arr1, arr2));

function isEqual(obj1, obj2) {
    //make sure all keys are the same from obj1 -> obj2
    for (var key in obj1) {
        if (obj1[key] && ! obj2[key]) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    //make sure all keys are the same from obj2 -> obj1
    for (var key in obj2) {
        if (obj2[key] && ! obj1[key]) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    //make sure the key values themselves match
    for (var key in obj1) {
        var left = obj1[key];
        var right = obj2[key];
        if (left instanceof Function) {
            //don't compare these
            continue;
        } 
        if (left instanceof Object || left instanceof Array){
            if (! isEqual(left, right)) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        else if (left != right) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

Or if you want to list the locations of all the differences, you can use something like:

var arr1 = [[8,0,3,0,0,7,0,9,0],[0,9,0,0,3,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,4,0,6],[0,0,0,0,3,9,7,6,0],[9,6,0,5,0,7,0,8,1],[0,7,4,6,8,0,0,0,0],[5,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,5,0,0,7,0],[0,6,0,7,0,0,1,0,8]];
var arr2 = [[8,0,3,0,0,7,0,9,0],[0,9,0,0,3,0,0,0,0],[1,0,0,0,1,1,4,0,6],[0,0,0,0,3,9,7,6,0],[9,6,0,5,0,7,0,8,1],[0,7,4,6,8,0,0,0,0],[5,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0,5,0,0,7,0],[0,6,0,7,0,0,1,0,8]];

alert(listDifferences(arr1, arr2));

function listDifferences(obj1, obj2, deltaList, keyPath) {
    if (! deltaList) {
        deltaList = [];
        keyPath = "";
    }
    //make sure all keys are the same from obj1 -> obj2
    for (var key in obj1) {
        if (obj1[key] && ! obj2[key]) {
            deltaList.push("obj1" + keyPath + "[" + key + "]");
        }
    }

    //make sure all keys are the same from obj2 -> obj1
    for (var key in obj2) {
        if (obj2[key] && ! obj1[key]) {
            deltaList.push("obj2" + keyPath + "[" + key + "]");
        }
    }

    //make sure the key values themselves match
    for (var key in obj1) {
        var left = obj1[key];
        var right = obj2[key];
        if (left instanceof Function) {
            //don't compare these
            continue;
        } 
        if (left instanceof Object || left instanceof Array){
            var startingLength = deltaList.length
            if (listDifferences(left, right, deltaList, keyPath + "[" + key + "]").length > startingLength) {
                deltaList.push("obj1" + keyPath + "[" + key + "]");
            }
        }
        else if (left != right) {
            deltaList.push("obj1" + keyPath + "[" + key + "]");
        }
    }

    return deltaList;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If, in the context of an object, the term "equal" means a reference to the same object, then there is no reason to exclude any type of object from the equivalence test. What do you expect to happen when comparing to a host object? It would also seem sensible to use a hasOwnProperty filter on the properties so that inherited enumerable properties aren't included in the comparison (they should evaluate to "equal" but there is no reason to iterate over them). Note that isEqual([1], {0:1}) returns true, which might not be expected. –  RobG Jun 24 '11 at 1:03
    
@RobG - Very good points, though I think for this exercise "equal" means having all the same fields set to the same value. I suspect comparing a host object will depend upon how the browser decides to expose that host object, and whether or not it does it in a consistent way. I suppose your isEqual([1], {0:1}) case could be dealt with by enforcing that typeof obj1 == typeof obj2, if the desired behavior is to return false in that case. –  aroth Jun 24 '11 at 1:15

I believe your method worsens performance at the expense of safety and readability. I strongly recommend against using this code in production unless:

  • You know that your technique does in fact work in general, even for edge cases like comparing numbers with different digits (e.g. 10 and 1), or poorly-rounded numbers like 8.999999998. A test suite is in order.
  • You have proved through benchmarks, on a few different browsers, that this method is significantly faster than the recursive algorithm.
  • The performance increase (if any) justifies the additional work others will have to do to understand your code.
  • You comment thoroughly, explaining what your code does, what assumptions your comparison function makes about the input arrays, why your code will work given those assumptions, and that your method is in fact faster than the naïve method.

My gut tells me that your technique is less efficient than the obvious (to you, maybe not to me) recursive algorithm. JSON.stringify has to recurse, anyway, in addition to the overhead involved in converting values to strings. Then, you loop through every character in the resulting string, rather than looping through elements, which are fewer in number.

share|improve this answer
    
At least in this one particular example, iteration seems to be quite a bit (20x in Chrome, 8x in Firefox) faster than recursion: jsfiddle.net/vC89B –  aroth Jun 24 '11 at 2:11
1  
@aroth: Your listDifferences function does a lot of object and key operations. See what happens if you assume the input is arrays only (which stringDifferences does) and use array operations rather than key operations. –  Joey Adams Jun 24 '11 at 4:06
1  
You're right, I revised it as you suggested, and recusrion is now 10x faster in Chrome and 4x faster in Firefox. That's quite a difference: jsfiddle.net/vC89B/2 –  aroth Jun 24 '11 at 4:32
    
you should do your tests here: jsperf.com –  vsync Jun 24 '11 at 7:51
    
if this was a 3D or more array, which method would be faster I wonder. –  vsync Jun 24 '11 at 7:58

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