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I've discovered (by accident) that the last CLR does the tail call optimization. I have tested it with a piece of code, but frankly it doesn't behave the way I expected. I thought the tail call optimization may happen when the last thing in the function is a function call.

I'm trying to "break" this code to prevent form tail call op.

class Program
{
    static void Foo(int counter, int limit)
    {
        try
        {
            if (counter == limit)
            {
                return;
            }
            Foo(++counter, limit);

            int d = 1;
            d = Bar(d);
            //Console.Write(d);
            //Thread.Sleep(1);
            int baz = 0;
            var z = baz + d;
            StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
            b.Append("D");
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }

    static int Sum(int s)
    {
        if (s == 1)
        {
            return s;
        }
        return s + Sum(s - 1);
    }

    static int Bar(int d)
    {
      return  d = 10 + d;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int i = 0;

        Foo(i, 10000); // jitter 
        Sum(10000);

        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        Foo(i, 10000);
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("time of execution = {0}ms",stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

        stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        Sum(10000);
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("time of execution = {0}ms", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Yet still Foo is optimized. How come?

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at the IL generated, or are you just basing this on the timing? –  Mike Caron Jun 24 '11 at 0:31
    
@Mike: Probably based on the non-explosive stack usage, although 10000 deep might not be enough to overflow the default stack when the function is so simple. –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 0:33
    
@Ben, I dunno. baz isn't used for anything meaningful, so I can see the compiler omitting it entirely, and I suspect the JITter would use the same storage for z as d, so it's only 8 bytes per frame, which isn't close to being enough to blow a default 1 Meg stack. Then again, the best way to tell would be to look at the IL ;) –  Mike Caron Jun 24 '11 at 0:36
1  
C# doesn't but Jitter does. –  lukas Jun 24 '11 at 1:11
1  
.NET's current handling of tail functions is pretty lousy. That's why the F# compiler optimizes it into a while(true) loop. –  vcsjones Jun 24 '11 at 2:13
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1 Answer

You haven't done anything with side-effects after the recursive call to Foo. I assume you tried the commented out code and it DID prevent optimization. So what's the problem?

You could also write to a class member, that would be a side-effect that couldn't be discarded.

private static int dummy;
static void Foo(int counter, int limit)
{
    if (counter == limit) return;
    Foo(++counter, limit);
    dummy++;
}

and then read dummy at the end of Main.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, it did not. 10 000 run of Thread.Sleep(1) takes 10 032ms. I though if I prevent optimization the stack would blow up. –  lukas Jun 24 '11 at 0:35
    
@lucas: This function doesn't use very much stack. Even 10000 nested calls isn't going to exhaust the default stack size on your thread. –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 0:36
    
I added dummy += z; to the Foo and still time is 0ms –  lukas Jun 24 '11 at 0:42
    
@lukas: Did you read dummy from Main like I suggested? –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 2:53
    
Yep in Console.WriteLine. –  lukas Jun 24 '11 at 12:24
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