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Is it possible to use JsonProperty annotation to map a nested Json property to a non-nested .NET member? Say you've got some Json like this:

{
     "id":9999,
     "created_date":"Thu, 23 Jun 2011 12:56:24 +0000",
     "pos":{
        "type":"someType",
        "coordinates":[
           59.323,
           18.0654
        ]
     }
}

and want to deserialize it into a flattened class MyClass using

JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<MyClass>(jsonstr);

Can annotations be used to map the Json coordinates list to Lat and Lng in the class below:

public class MyClass {
   [JsonProperty("id")]
   public int Id { get; set; }
   [JsonProperty("created_date")]
   public DateTime Created { get; set; }
   [JsonProperty("????")]
   public float Lat { get; set; }
   [JsonProperty("?????")]
   public float Lng { get; set; }
}

Just curious. I can always define the class like this and it seems to work fine:

public class MyClass {
    [JsonProperty("id")]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("date_created")]
    public DateTime Created { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("pos")]
    public PosClass Pos { get; set; }
}

public class PosClass
{
    public List<float> coordinates { get; set; }
}
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Why do you want to deserialize it to a flattened class? –  Peter Long Jun 24 '11 at 1:03
8  
This is just an example but there can obviously be many cases when you want to model the internal data differently than the original json representation. –  jul Jun 26 '11 at 10:54

2 Answers 2

I Think it's better if you won't flatten it at all. There are multiple reasons why NOT to do so:

  1. if in some point you'll have to fields with same name.
  2. if you'd like to change an attribute, you'll have to reconstruct the JSON object from scratch.

The best option for you is to read a bit about data crawling using JSon - here. Very easy and useful.

After - if you'll still insist, you can wrap it in a nice new class.

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For really complex JSON Situations I really like the manual mapping approach Demis Bellot has taken with ServiceStack.Text. This allows me to pass an httpResponse.Content to a JsonConverter.Convert(string json) method.

This has the added benefit of keeping your model objects squeaky clean.

var place = JsonObject.Parse(JsonCentroid)
.Object("place")
.ConvertTo(x => new Place
{
    WoeId = x.Get<int>("woeid"),
    PlaceTypeName = x.Get(""),
    PlaceTypeNameAttrs = x.Object("placeTypeName attrs"),
    Name = x.Get("Name"),
    BoundingBox = x.Object("boundingBox")
            .ConvertTo(y => new BoundingBox
            {        
                    SouthWest = y.Object("southWest").ConvertTo(toCentroid),
                    NorthEast = y.Object("northEast").ConvertTo(toCentroid)
            }),
});

You can see the full test here.

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