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public class BaseClass {
   public void start() {
      // do something
   }
}

public class ClassA extends BaseClass {

}

ClassA c = new ClassA();
c.start();

In the following code I want to use the start() method as it was defined in the super class, I have seen in a lot of other developer's codes that they override the method in the super class and then they call the super. is there a reason for that?

public class ClassA extends BaseClass {
   @Override
   public void start() {
      super.start();
   }
}
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@Jeanne Boyarsky, right on the money! it is a matter of preference to each developer, usually your documentation should be good enought that you don't need to do this, but more clarity is always better than less. –  bdparrish Jun 24 '11 at 1:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Clarity? Some developers feel it is clearer to show the method in the subclass. I disagree. It's redundant info.

At least since Java 5, you could add an @Override so the compiler will tell you if the signature changes/disappears.

Except for constructors. For constructors, you really do have to create your own with the same signature and delegate upwards. In this case, omitting isn't equivalent though.

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1  
+1 It is redundant and confusing. If you see that the method was overridden (which the IDE will show you, even if you cannot see the source), you would think that it also does something else then the inherited default. Also, if you override the method, there should be Javadoc for it. –  Thilo Jun 24 '11 at 1:24
    
@Thilo: I don't find it clearer personally and don't practice it on my team. The argument is that people new to Java aren't in the habit of looking in the superclass. (Same argument for not using the ternary operator.) I don't like things that are overly accommodating to non-Java developers. One should learn the conventions and idioms of the languages one is working on. –  Jeanne Boyarsky Jun 24 '11 at 1:26
public class ClassA extends BaseClass {
  @Override
  public void start() {
     super.start();
  }
}

does exactly the same thing as not overriding at all like this

public class ClassA extends BaseClass {}

So unless you have some extra functionality to add (in which case you call super class's method and then add your extra logic) or to do something different(you don't call super class's method and just define some different logic), it's best you don't override super class's method (and call super class's method) because it's pointless.

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Overriding a method, doing something special, then calling super.method() is called decorating a method - you're adding to the behaviour. Read more here: Decorator Pattern.

Overriding it without calling super's method is simply overriding a method - changing the behaviour.

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There is no reason to do that. This method should be deleted.

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I sometimes do this (temporarily, during development) when I want to set a break-point there.

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Why don't you set break-point in the super class. –  javaguy Jun 25 '11 at 21:45
    
@javaguy: Then it also breaks there for super-class instances. –  Thilo Jun 26 '11 at 0:11

The main reason behind the concept of inheritance is generalization of the functions or operations that are common among sub classes. It makes sense to override only when we need to customize the operation for the particular sub-class.

  • But one place where we do need to make an override is, say you have overloaded your super class default constructor, then in sub-class you need to mention the invocation of the overloaded super-class constructor as the first line in your sub-class constructor(ie Super-class object has to be created before sub-class creation). For example

class BaseClass{

Baseclass(arg1){

}

}

class A extends BaseClass{

A{ super(arg1); }

}

In other places it would only add a redundancy of the code, which is not at all necessary

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