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I'm new to C++ so this is probably a very simple question, but I haven't been able to find any examples online that have helped.

I've defined my own Bubble class and I need to create a vector/list (I'm used to C# and Java, so I'm not sure which is correct) to dynamically store Bubble objects in. Here's my code so far:

#include "Bubble.h"
#include <vector>
#include <list>

int backgroundImages[10]; 
list<Bubble> bubbles;
vector<Bubble> bubbles_two;
Bubble b;

void AppMain()
{
    loadImages();
    ViewAdd(backgroundImages[8], 0,0);
    b = Bubble();
    b.velocity = Vector2D(9,4);

    //I know this can't be right..
    bubbles.add(b);
    bubbles_two.add(b);
}

Neither the list nor the vector works - it says "list/vector is not a template" in my error list.

Which should I use, list or vector? And how do I correctly implement it?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

The functions vector.add() and list.add() do not exist.

#include "Bubble.h"
#include <vector>
#include <list>

int backgroundImages[10]; 
std::list<Bubble> bubbles(); // use the std namespace and instantiate it
std::vector<Bubble> bubbles_two(); // same here
Bubble b;

void AppMain()
{
    loadImages();
    ViewAdd(backgroundImages[8], 0,0);
    b = Bubble();
    b.velocity = Vector2D(9,4);

    //I know this can't be right..
    bubbles.push_back(b); // std::list also defines the method push_front
    bubbles_two.push_back(b);
}

There are almost no obvious differences between the vector and the list, but functionally, there are.

Compared to the other base standard sequence containers (deques and lists), vectors are generally the most efficient in time for accessing elements and to add or remove elements from the end of the sequence. For operations that involve inserting or removing elements at positions other than the end, they perform worse than deques and lists, and have less consistent iterators and references than lists.

Compared to other base standard sequence containers (vectors and deques), lists perform generally better in inserting, extracting and moving elements in any position within the container, and therefore also in algorithms that make intensive use of these, like sorting algorithms.

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2  
"almost no obvious differences"? How about random access with []/::at? That's the most obvious distinction between the two, and it's not something you can really ignore when picking one or the other. – Nicol Bolas Jun 24 '11 at 2:31

They are in the std namespace. As are all parts of the C++ standard library. So they are correctly called std::list and std::vector.

They also don't have member functions called add. You may want to look up a C++ reference.

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Vector and list are part of the std namespace. So you should declare your vector and your list like this:

std::list<Bubble> bubbles;
std::vector<Bubble> bubbles_two;

Also, the member function to add an element is push_back.

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list and vector are in the std namespace, and you accordingly must look for them there.

std::vector<Bubble> bubbles;

In either case, you use .push_back to append to the container. When in doubt, you should generally prefer vector.

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Try

std::list<Bubble> bubbles;
std::vector<Bubble> bubbles_two;

Lists and vectors are defined in the std namespace.

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You are missing the namespace here. Both list and vector is part of the standard namespace which Means that you can include the namespace on a global basis by writing using namespace std; once in the beginning of the file or write std::list and std::vector every where you are using the variables.

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