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I have the following SQL script. After it runs the foreign key relationship is never enforced.

CREATE TABLE Country (
  name varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  abbreviation varchar(4) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (name)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE StateProvince (
  countryName varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  name varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  abbreviation varchar(3) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (countryName,name)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

alter table StateProvince
add index FK_StateProvince_Country (countryName),
add constraint FK_StateProvince_Country
foreign key (countryName)
references Country (name);

Is this because of the composite primary key?

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Why have you used CountryName as composite primary key and foreign key in the stateprovince table. Is it not better to use CountryName as a foreign key alone. –  saravanan Jun 24 '11 at 3:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to the MySQL docs on foreign keys, The MyISAM table engine does not support foreign keys. Instead it silently ignores them. Use InnoDB instead. Try this:

CREATE TABLE Country (
  name varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  abbreviation varchar(4) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE StateProvince (
  countryName varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  name varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  abbreviation varchar(3) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (countryName,name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

alter table StateProvince
add index FK_StateProvince_Country (countryName),
add constraint FK_StateProvince_Country
foreign key (countryName)
references Country (name);
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Only the InnoDB engine supports foreign keys:

InnoDB supports foreign key constraints.

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It had nothing to do with that, as per this article

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/example-foreign-keys.html

A foreign key constraint is not required merely to join two tables. For storage engines other than InnoDB, it is possible when defining a column to use a REFERENCES tbl_name(col_name) clause, which has no actual effect, and serves only as a memo or comment to you that the column which you are currently defining is intended to refer to a column in another table. It is extremely important to realize when using this syntax that:

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@Benju.

You have to replace MyISAM with InnoDB and then you can use Primary key as a composite or single. It works and i have tested.

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