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Here is my problem (I'm using SQL Server)

I have a table of Students (StudentId, Firstname, Lastname, etc).

I have a table that records StudentAttendance (StudentId, ClassDate, etc.)

I record other student activity (I'm generalizing here for simplicity) such as a Papers table (StudentId, PaperId, etc.). There may be anywhere from zero to 20 papers turned in. Similarly, there is a table called Projects (StudentId, ProjectId, etc.). Same deal as with Papers.

What I'm trying to do is create a list of counts for students who have attendance over a certain level (say 10 attendances). Something like this:

ID    Name      Att    Paper Proj
123   Baker     23     0     2
234   Charlie   26     5     3
345   Delta     13     3     0

Here is what I have:

select 
  s.StudentId,
  s.Lastname,
  COUNT(sa.StudentId) as CountofAttendance,
  COUNT(p.StudentId) as CountofPapers
from Student s
inner join StudentAttendance sa on (s.StudentId = sa.StudentId)
left outer join Paper p on (s.StudentId = p.StudentId)
group by s.StudentId, s.Lastname
Having COUNT(sa.StudentId) > 10
order by CountofAttendance

If the CountofPaper and join (either inner or left outer) to the Papers table is commented out, the query works fine. I get a nice count of students who have attended at least 10 classes.

However, if I put in the CountofPapers and the join, things get crazy. With a left outer join, any students with papers just show their attendance count in the paper column. With an inner join, both attendance and paper counts seem to multiple off each other.

Guidance needed and appreciated.

Dave

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is there are multiple papers per student, so a StudentAttendance row for every row of Paper that joins: the counts will be re-added every time. Try this:

select 
  s.StudentId,
  s.Lastname,
  (select COUNT(*) from StudentAttendance where s.StudentId = sa.StudentId) as CountofAttendance,
  (select COUNT(*) from Paper where s.StudentId = p.StudentId) as CountofPapers
from Student s
where (select COUNT(*) from StudentAttendance where s.StudentId = sa.StudentId) > 10
order by CountofAttendance

EDITED to incorporate issue with reference to CountofAttendance

btw, this isn't the fastest solution, but it is the easiest to understand, which was my intention. You can avoid the re-calculation by using a join to an aliased select, but as I said, this is the simplest.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you billinkc, Bohemian, and Alex Aza for great answers. I really appreciate the time you each took to work out a solution. I'm going to mark Bohemian's as the answer but I think each solution would have worked. The only issue I ran into with your answer, Bohemian, is for some reason the "where CountofAttendance > 10" is used, SSMS is not recognizing it as a column. I ended up duplicating the select from the "as CountofAttendance" and the query works (inefficiently, no doubt). The "order of CountAttendance" is fine, which is the odd part. Thanks also to marc_s for edit. Best, Dave –  Dave Jun 24 '11 at 6:10

Look at using Common Table Expressions and then divide and conquer your problem. BTW, you are off by 1 in your original query, you'll have 11 minimum attendence

;
WITH GOOD_STUDENTS AS
(
-- this query defines all students with 10+ attendance
SELECT
    S.StudentID
,   count(1) AS attendence_count
FROM
    Student S
    inner join 
    StudentAttendance sa 
    on (s.StudentId = sa.StudentId)
GROUP BY
    S.StudentId
HAVING
    COUNT(1) >= 10
)
,  STUDIOUS_STUDENTS AS
(
-- lather, rinse, repeat for other metrics
SELECT
    S.StudentID
,   count(1) AS paper_count
FROM
    Student S
    inner join 
    Papers P 
    on (s.StudentId = P.StudentId)
GROUP BY
    S.StudentId
)
,  GREGARIOUS_STUDENTS AS
(
SELECT
    S.StudentID
,   count(1) AS project_count
FROM
    Student S
    inner join 
    Projects P 
    on (s.StudentId = P.StudentId)
GROUP BY
    S.StudentId
)
-- And now we roll it all together
SELECT
    S.*
,   G.attendance_count
,   SS.paper_count
,   GS.project_count
-- ad nauseum
FROM
    -- back to the well on this one as there may be 
    -- students did nothing
    Students S
    LEFT OUTER JOIN
        GOOD_STUDENTS G
        ON G.studentId = S.studentId
    LEFT OUTER JOIN
        STUDIOUS_STUDENTS SS
        ON SS.studentId = S.studentId
    LEFT OUTER JOIN
        GREGARIOUS_STUDENTS GS
        ON GS.studentId = S.studentId

I see plenty of other answer rolling in but I typed for far too long to quit ;)

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Thanks for the time you put in Bill. Dave –  Dave Jun 24 '11 at 6:14

Try this:

select std.StudentId, std.Lastname, att.AttCount, pap.PaperCount, prj.ProjCount
from Students std
    left join
    (
        select StudentId, count(*) AttCount
        from StudentAttendance
    ) att on
        std.StudentId = att.StudentId
    left join
    (
        select StudentId, count(*) PaperCount
        from Papers
    ) pap on
        std.StudentId = pap.StudentId
    left join
    (
        select StudentId, count(*) ProjCount
        from Projects
    ) prj on
        std.StudentId = prj.StudentId
where att.AttCount > 10
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution Alex –  Dave Jun 24 '11 at 6:14

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