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I have defined a with some "common" values. How can I extend the common list by additional values to various new beans?

<util:list id="myCommonList" list-class="java.util.LinkedList">
 <bean .../>
 <bean .../>
 <bean .../>
 <bean .../>
</util:list>


<bean id="extension" parent="myCommonList">
  <bean ref="additionalValue"/>
</bean>

Will this overwrite the list or extend it?

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After reading many solutions, I came up with the following one: stackoverflow.com/questions/14520536/spring-collection-merge/… –  BTakacs Jan 25 '13 at 15:03
    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/4656460/… –  Vadzim May 20 '13 at 16:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can do it, but not using <util:list>, which is just a convenience syntax. The container does provide a "collection merging" function, but you have to use the "old" style:

<bean id="parent" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.ListFactoryBean">
    <property name="sourceList">
        <list>
            <value>X</value>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>

<bean id="child" parent="parent" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.ListFactoryBean">
    <property name="sourceList">
        <list merge="true">
            <value>Y</value>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>
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According to this JIRA; there is no trivial solution for this (currently, but hopefully in 3.1 there will be), though there are several workarounds; e.g. this one.

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Today I was having this issue too. For me the acceptable solution was to use SpEL and while SpEL doesn't supports multiple statements - create two auxiliary classes that appends lists.

Context might be implemented like this:

<util:list id="list1">
    <value>str1</value>
    <value>str2</value>
</util:list>

<util:list id="list2">
    <value>str3</value>
    <value>str4</value>
</util:list>

<bean ...>
    <property name="propertyThatRequiresMergedList"
        value="#{ new x.y.springs.StringListsMerger().merge(@list1, @list2) }" />
</bean>

And classes:

package x.y.springs;

import java.util.List;

public abstract class ListsMerger<T extends List> {
    public T merge(T ... lists) {
        T container = createContainer();
        for (T list : lists) {
            container.addAll(list);
        }
        return container;
    }
    public abstract T createContainer();
}


package x.y.springs;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class StringListsMerger extends ListsMerger<List<String>> {

    @Override
    public List<String> createContainer() {
        return new ArrayList<String>();
    }

}
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This is quite cool although not really sure why you didnt just use a concrete implementation of the generic ListsMerger class. –  DD. May 14 '13 at 11:18
    
DD. Are you asking about using of something like #{ new x.y.springs.ListsMerger<String>().merge(@list1, @list2) }"? This will not work if there is no any usage of ListMerger<String> in java files, otherwise it will not compile ListMerger implementation for String. –  Mikhail Tsaplin May 16 '13 at 15:25
    
"#{ new x.y.springs.GenericListsMerger().merge(@list1, @list2) }" –  DD. May 16 '13 at 21:02
    
Just have a generic class...why do you need to create a concrete class for every type? –  DD. May 16 '13 at 21:02

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