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I am looking for high performance Java library that provides methods that allows me to get:

  1. Current hour (0-24)
  2. Current day (1-31)
  3. Current week (1-52)
  4. Current month (1-12)
  5. Current season (1-4)
  6. Current year (YYYY or YY)

Performance is a most important issue for me. This is why I cannot use standard Calendar class. The best would be solution that does all calculations without creating new objects.

ADDED: To clarify I will mention one more time: more that 100000 operations per second.

share|improve this question
    
What's wrong with Calendar? –  adarshr Jun 24 '11 at 8:39
    
Calendar is VERY SLOW. I need to do about +100000 ops. Calendar doesn't work for my case. Need some sort of formulas with pure math. No objects. –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 8:45
    
+100000 in how much time ? If you have to do so in 1 day, no problem :-) –  Riduidel Jun 24 '11 at 8:49
    
Are you using Calendar correctly? Can you show some example code? –  Dorus Jun 24 '11 at 8:53
    
I am curious to know how Joda Time, as suggested in @Gareth's answer made such a difference for you. I posted another answer (which is really more like a question I suppose) to ask for comments. My experiment suggests Joda Chronology is slower than JDK Calendar for the use you seem to be making. –  sudocode Jun 24 '11 at 12:36

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could actually use the excellant joda-time library to do this. The Chronology implementations in joda provide the logic behind the DateTime getHour getDay type methods. There is no problem using it directly if you wish to skip creating DateTime instants.

long msSinceEpoch = System.currentTimeMillis();

Chronology chronology = ISOChronology.getInstanceUTC() // This can be static

chronology.hourOfDay().get(msSinceEpoch);
chronology.dayOfMonth().get(msSinceEpoch);
chronology.weekOfWeek().get(msSinceEpoch);
chronology.monthOfYear().get(msSinceEpoch);
chronology.years().get(msSinceEpoch);

Session isn't something that joda has a concept of. You will have to work it out from the month given your own rules.

See joda-time documentation on Chronology

share|improve this answer
    
Right, Season I can calculate myself easily :-) Thank you for your suggestion! –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 10:55
    
Hi Davis, JODA works like a charm. 4 000 000 operations per second. Just wanted to know which JDK do you use? It is very strange that you have System.currentTimeInMillis(); I have only System.currentTimeMillis(); Thank you again and all the best for England! –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 11:07
1  
I use my own customised version of OpenJDK that I compiled by self and run on a Smart phone just to annoy Oracle –  Gareth Davis Jun 24 '11 at 11:11
    
Holy Madona! Double respect from me to you!!! –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 11:21

Are you sure that Calendar is too slow or do you just believe it? Did you measure it?

Creating new objects in Java is pretty cheap. Keeping them around is expensive.

That said, either try Joda Time or copy the algorithms from the Java code into static helper methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for you suggestion Aaron. Of course I did some measurements. Calendar is VERY SLOW, its implementation cannot handle the load I have. –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 10:54
1  
I tried measuring it with the usage suggested in the question and accepted answer. Calendar appears to run faster than Joda for this case. –  sudocode Jun 24 '11 at 12:44

You can get the current time and calculate the current hours,min,second,millis by division and remainder. The day,month,years only change once per day so you only need to calculate that when it changes.

You can use the cached day/month/year and calculate the rest in sub-micro-second time, without creating objects (more than once per day)

import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.TimeZone;

public class Daytime {
    private static final long HOUR_MS = 3600*1000;

    public short year;
    public byte month, day;
    public byte hour, min, sec;
    public short millis;

    private long lastMillis = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    private final TimeZone timeZone;
    private long timeOffset;

    public Daytime() {
        timeZone = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
        now();
    }

    public Daytime(TimeZone timeZone) {
        this.timeZone = timeZone;
        now();
    }

    public void now() {
        long now = System.currentTimeMillis() + timeOffset;
        if (now == lastMillis) return;
        long cachePeriod = now/HOUR_MS;
        // could the day have changed?
        if (cachePeriod != lastMillis/HOUR_MS) {
            timeOffset = timeZone.getOffset(now);
            Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(timeZone);
            year = (short) cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);
            month = (byte) cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);
            day = (byte) cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
            hour = (byte) cal.get(Calendar.HOUR);
        }
        millis = (short) (now % 1000);
        now /= 1000;
        sec = (byte) (now % 60);
        now /= 60;
        min = (byte) (now % 60);
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        Daytime dt = new Daytime();
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        final int runs = 10 * 1000 * 1000;
        for(int i=0;i< runs;i++)
            dt.now();
        long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
        System.out.printf("Daytime.now() took %.3f micro-seconds on average%n", time/1e3/runs);
    }
}

prints

Daytime.now() took 0.287 micro-seconds on average

There are various assumptions about how daylight saving changes occur. You may need to have the checking period change to suit you needs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for benchmark code. Actually I have to calculate some near real time stats for huge amount of users online and offline. And the stat based on the numbers I mentioned in the question above. This is why it is really hard for me to adjust calculations. –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 10:48
    
I believe using cached information is the way to go. If you want sub-milli-second timing you need to make use of System.nanoTime() or a system call via JNI. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 24 '11 at 11:33

Use only one object and update it's time like so:

Date d = new Date();
...
d.setTime(System.currentTimeMillis());
share|improve this answer
    
Sun's version of java.util.Date creates a new object after you call setTime(), so I guess it won't fit. –  fernacolo Jun 24 '11 at 8:52
    
@fernacolo any source for that ? I wasn't aware of it. –  Giann Jun 24 '11 at 8:54
1  
I can't paste Sun's code because it's copyrighted and "confidential", but you can check doing this: install JDK 5 or earlier, open src.zip, find java/util/Date.java, and look at setTime(long millis). This will clear a reference called cdate. Then anytime you need some component (like year, day), it will call normalize() that will instantiate a new object for that reference. –  fernacolo Jun 24 '11 at 9:02

You can use java.util.Calander, and if not happy with that you can probable use Joda Time.

This can help you out.

share|improve this answer

You may use Joda Time because it's much faster than Calendar, and do this:

LocalDateTime now = new LocalDateTime(); // automatically points to current datetime.
int hour = now.getHourOfDay();
int day = now.getDayOfMonth();
int week = now.getWeekOfWeekyear();
int month = now.getMonthOfYear();
int year = now.getYear();
int season = getSeason(day, month);

The getSeason() is easy to implement. There is no solution that does all this without creating any object. By the way, why do you need so much performance?!?!

share|improve this answer

Be aware that Calendar.getInstance is quite expensive, but you can typically get your Calendar object by invoking that method once and reusing (unless you need Calendar per thread: Calendar is not thread safe).

share|improve this answer
    
I ran a small bench, and could call Calendar.getInstance() 50.000 times in 1 second. How is that slow? –  Dorus Jun 24 '11 at 9:21
    
I can create 5 million different Strings in loop in 1 second. Why should I care about creating lots of Strings in execution hot spots? If you look at Calendar creation, it is not exactly a lightweight operation. If you profiled code in an execution hotspot, I think you would find that maintaining a single Calendar would be cheaper than invoking Calendar.getInstance every time a Calendar is required. I seem to recall making that change myself in production code. But it's just a suggestion. –  sudocode Jun 24 '11 at 10:32
    
BTW, try this in your benchmark. Get a Date using calendar.getTime() in a loop. Version 1: Calendar is created inside the loop. Version 2: Calendar is created before the loop. Crank up the repetitions. Which runs faster? (I find version 2 runs > 20 times faster). –  sudocode Jun 24 '11 at 10:48

I have read so many posts about Joda Time on SO now that I finally downloaded it and gave it a try.

The answer from Gareth Davis has already been accepted, and I have no issue with that. But I am curious to know where it is that Joda Time made the difference.

Based on the question and the accepted answer, I made a class to compare the execution times of JDK Calendar and Joda Time Chronology.

I find that the Calendar implementation runs consistently faster, not quite twice as fast.

import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;

import org.joda.time.Chronology;
import org.joda.time.chrono.ISOChronology;


public class CalendarTest {

    private static final int ITERATIONS = 1000000;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            jdkCalendar();
            jodaChronology();
        }
    }

    private static void jdkCalendar() {
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
        int hourOfDay = 0;
        int dayOfMonth = 0;
        int weekOfYear = 0;
        int month = 0;
        int year = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++) {
            c.setTimeInMillis(System.currentTimeMillis());
            hourOfDay = c.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);
            dayOfMonth = c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
            weekOfYear = c.get(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR);
            month = c.get(Calendar.MONTH);
            year = c.get(Calendar.YEAR);
        }
        long duration = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
        System.err.printf("jdk:  duration %d, hourOfDay: %d, dayOfMonth: %d, weekOfYear: %d, month: %d, year: %d\n", duration, hourOfDay, dayOfMonth, weekOfYear, month, year);
    }

    private static void jodaChronology() {
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        Chronology chronology = ISOChronology.getInstanceUTC(); // This can be static
        int hourOfDay = 0;
        int dayOfMonth = 0;
        int weekOfYear = 0;
        int month = 0;
        int year = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++) {
            long msSinceEpoch = System.currentTimeMillis();
            hourOfDay = chronology.hourOfDay().get(msSinceEpoch);
            dayOfMonth = chronology.dayOfMonth().get(msSinceEpoch);
            weekOfYear = chronology.weekOfWeekyear().get(msSinceEpoch);
            month = chronology.monthOfYear().get(msSinceEpoch);
            year = chronology.years().getValue(msSinceEpoch);
        }
        long duration = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
        System.err.printf("joda: duration %d, hourOfDay: %d, dayOfMonth: %d, weekOfYear: %d, month: %d, year: %d\n", duration, hourOfDay, dayOfMonth, weekOfYear, month, year);
    }

}

Sample output:

jdk:  duration 1714, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 2099, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 377, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 689, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 340, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 680, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 330, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 653, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 326, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 596, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 337, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 620, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 471, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 590, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 326, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 591, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 336, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 595, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
jdk:  duration 327, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 5, year: 2011
joda: duration 560, hourOfDay: 12, dayOfMonth: 24, weekOfYear: 25, month: 6, year: 41
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Sudocode! Thank you very much for your benchmark. I did the same (code a little bit different, but also does 1 000 000 ops). I have for JODA: ~300 and for Calendar ~720. Not that much but still for me Calendar slower. I did test on java version "1.6.0_22" Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_22-b04-307-10M3261) Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 17.1-b03-307, mixed mode) –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 13:05
    
@MinimeDJ I tried now running the same code with 3 different JVMs, the first being the one from my original benchmark: IBM Corporation, 1.5.0, 2.3, IBM J9 VM. Sun Microsystems Inc., 1.6.0_24, 19.1-b02, Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM. IBM Corporation, 1.6.0, 2.4, IBM J9 VM. The performance is better overall for the 1.6 JVMs, but there is no reversal of JDK versus Joda. The JDK Calendar implementation still beats the Joda Chronlogy implementation consistently for this code. –  sudocode Jun 24 '11 at 13:27
    
that is very strange indeed... –  Max B Jun 24 '11 at 17:49

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