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I have file that are uploaded which are formatted like so

MR 1

MR 2

MR 100

MR 200

MR 300

ETC.

What i need to do is add extra two 00s before anything before MR 10 and add one extra 0 before MR10-99

So files are formatted

MR 001

MR 010

MR 076

ETC.

Any help would be great!

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1  
jQuery will not help you here (at least not for the formatting stuff)... but how do you access the file? How do you get it's contents? Somehow the context is not clear. Please provide at least some code, so that we can understand the problem better. –  Felix Kling Jun 24 '11 at 9:51

8 Answers 8

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Assuming you have those values stored in some strings, try this:

function pad (str, max) {
  str = str.toString();
  return str.length < max ? pad("0" + str, max) : str;
}

pad("3", 3);    // => "003"
pad("123", 3);  // => "123"
pad("1234", 3); // => "1234"

var test = "MR 2";
var parts = test.split(" ");
parts[1] = pad(parts[1], 3);
parts.join(" "); // => "MR 002"
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Awesome! This helped me a ton! I wish jQuery had a function builtin like PHP's str_pad() function –  FastTrack Nov 12 '12 at 14:52
2  
I know this is old, but this function helped me and I thought I'd add to it. This will perform type conversion for integer or float variables, meaning you can do pad(85, 5) as well as pad("85", 5). return (str).toString().length < max ? pad("0" + (str).toString(), max) : (str).toString(); –  Rémi Breton Nov 16 '12 at 20:57
4  
@RémiBreton Your function uses too many times .toString(). I think it would be better function pad (str, max) { str=str.toString(); function main(str,max){ return str.length < max ? main("0" + str, max) : str; } return main(str,max); } –  Oriol Feb 27 '13 at 20:13
2  
String.prototype.padLeft = function padLeft(length, leadingChar) { if (leadingChar === undefined) leadingChar = "0"; return this.length < length ? (leadingChar + this).padLeft(length, leadingChar) : this; }; –  Tim Valentine May 14 '13 at 20:21
    
jsfiddle.net/KSJZq/7 –  Tim Valentine May 14 '13 at 20:21

I have a potential solution which I guess is relevent, I posted about it here:

https://www.facebook.com/antimatterstudios/posts/10150752380719364

basically, you want a minimum length of 2 or 3, you can adjust how many 0's you put in this piece of code

var d = new Date();
var h = ("0"+d.getHours()).slice(-2);
var m = ("0"+d.getMinutes()).slice(-2);
var s = ("0"+d.getSeconds()).slice(-2);

I knew I would always get a single integer as a minimum (cause hour 1, hour 2) etc, but if you can't be sure of getting anything but an empty string, you can just do "000"+d.getHours() to make sure you get the minimum.

then you want 3 numbers? just use -3 instead of -2 in my code, I'm just writing this because I wanted to construct a 24 hour clock in a super easy fashion.

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function addLeadingZeros (n, length)
{
    var str = (n > 0 ? n : -n) + "";
    var zeros = "";
    for (var i = length - str.length; i > 0; i--)
        zeros += "0";
    zeros += str;
    return n >= 0 ? zeros : "-" + zeros;
}

//addLeadingZeros (1, 3) =   "001"
//addLeadingZeros (12, 3) =  "012"
//addLeadingZeros (123, 3) = "123"
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In other words: convert it to a string, then pad with zeros. –  pavium Jun 24 '11 at 10:00

This is the function that I generally use in my code to prepend zeros to a number or string.

The inputs are the string or number (str), and the desired length of the output (len).

var PrependZeros = function (str, len) {
    if(typeof str === 'number' || Number(str)){
    str = str.toString();
    return (len - str.length > 0) ? new Array(len + 1 - str.length).join('0') + str: str;
}
else{
    for(var i = 0,spl = str.split(' '); i < spl.length; spl[i] = (Number(spl[i])&& spl[i].length < len)?PrependZeros(spl[i],len):spl[i],str = (i == spl.length -1)?spl.join(' '):str,i++);
    return str;
}

};

Examples:

PrependZeros('MR 3',3);    // MR 003
PrependZeros('MR 23',3);   // MR 023
PrependZeros('MR 123',3);  // MR 123
PrependZeros('foo bar 23',3);  // foo bar 023
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+1 I love the new Array(len + 1 - str.length).join('0') idea! –  Oriol Feb 27 '13 at 20:02

If you split on the space, you can add leading zeros using a simple function like:

function addZeros(n) {
  return (n < 10)? '00' + n : (n < 100)? '0' + n : '' + n;
}

So you can test the length of the string and if it's less than 6, split on the space, add zeros to the number, then join it back together.

Or as a regular expression:

function addZeros(s) {
  return s.replace(/ (\d$)/,' 00$1').replace(/ (\d\d)$/,' 0$1');
}

I'm sure someone can do it with one replace, not two.

Edit - examples

alert(addZeros('MR 3'));    // MR 003
alert(addZeros('MR 23'));   // MR 023
alert(addZeros('MR 123'));  // MR 123
alert(addZeros('foo bar 23'));  // foo bar 023

It will put one or two zeros infront of a number at the end of a string with a space in front of it. It doesn't care what bit before the space is.

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What happens if say someone if a document has MR 003 can we ignore adding the 0s etc. –  Chill Web Designs Jun 24 '11 at 10:19
    
I cant seem to get the second part working? –  Chill Web Designs Jun 24 '11 at 10:34

In simple terms we can written as follows,

for(var i=1;i<=31;i++)
    i=(i<10) ? '0'+i : i;

//Because most of the time we need this for day, month or amount matters.

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Just for a laugh do it the long nasty way....:
(NOTE: ive not used this, and i would not advise using this.!)

function pad(str, new_length) {
    ('00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000' + str).
    substr((50 + str.toString().length) - new_length, new_length)
}
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I needed something like this myself the other day, Pud instead of always a 0, I wanted to be able to tell it what I wanted padded ing the front. Here's what I came up with for code:

function lpad(n, e, d) {
  var o = ''; if(typeof(d) === 'undefined'){ d='0'; } if(typeof(e) === 'undefined'){ e=2; }
  if(n.length < e){ for(var r=0; r < e - n.length; r++){ o += d; } o += n; } else { o=n; }
  return o; }

Where n is what you want padded, e is the power you want it padded to (number of characters long it should be), and d is what you want it to be padded with. Seems to work well for what I needed it for, but it would fail if "d" was more than one character long is some cases.

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