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When querying Active Directory for users - is there a way to filter out user accounts created for computers? Ideally a way which is common across most typical networks. e.g.:

DirectorySearcher ds = new DirectorySearcher(new DirectoryEntry([Users_OU_root]));    
ds.filter = "(&(objectClass=User)([CRITERIA_TO_FILTER_OUT_COMPUTER_USER_ACCOUNTS]))";    
ds.FindAll();    
...
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up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you're on .NET 3.5 and up, you should check out the System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement (S.DS.AM) namespace. Read all about it here:

Basically, you can define a domain context and easily find users and/or groups in AD:

// set up domain context
PrincipalContext ctx = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain);

// find a user
UserPrincipal user = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(ctx, "SomeUserName");

if(user != null)
{
   // do something here....     
}

// find the group in question
GroupPrincipal group = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(ctx, "YourGroupNameHere");

// if found....
if (group != null)
{
   // iterate over members
   foreach (Principal p in group.GetMembers())
   {
      Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", p.StructuralObjectClass, p.DisplayName);
      // do whatever you need to do to those members
   }
}

The new S.DS.AM makes it really easy to play around with users and groups in AD:

Computer accounts will show up as ComputerPrincipal (derived from Principal) - so you can easily keep users and computer accounts apart.

If you cannot or don't want to move to S.DS.AM - you can also keep user and computers apart by using the objectCategory instead of the objectClass in your LDAP filter. objectCategory is beneficial anyway, since it's indexed, and not multi-valued - so query performance will be much better.

For a real-life user, use objectCategory = Person, while for a computer, use objectCategory = Computer in your LDAP filter.

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Even if I agree with the answer. Active-Directory remain an LDAP server. Here is the filter you are looking for :

(&(objectCategory=user)(objectClass=user)(...))

'objectCategory=user' is a shortcut for 'objectCategory=CN=User,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=dom,DC=fr' understood by Active-Directory but it's also a way in others Directories, that's why I put an answer, even if another answer is accepted.

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