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How would I write the equivalent of C#'s String.StartsWith in Javascript?

var data = 'hello world';
var input = 'he';

//data.startsWith(input) == true
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10  
The accepted answer below is not considered to be the most efficient, have a look at Mark Byers' answer. –  Jaap Apr 16 '13 at 7:59
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14 Answers

up vote 750 down vote accepted

You can add this function to the String prototype:

if (typeof String.prototype.startsWith != 'function') {
  // see below for better implementation!
  String.prototype.startsWith = function (str){
    return this.indexOf(str) == 0;
  };
}

Then you can use it directly on string values:

"Hello World!".startsWith("He"); // true

var data = "Hello world";
var input = 'He';
data.startsWith(input); // true

Edit: Note that I'm checking if the function exists before defining it, that's because in the future, the language might have this strings extras methods defined as built-in functions, and native implementations are always faster and preferred, see the ECMAScript Harmony String Extras proposal.

Edit: As others noted, indexOf will be inefficient for large strings, its complexity is O(N). For a constant-time solution (O(1)), you can use either, substring as @cobbal suggested, or String.prototype.slice, which behaves similarly (note that I don't recommend using the substr, because it's inconsistent between implementations (most notably on JScript) ):

if (typeof String.prototype.startsWith != 'function') {
  String.prototype.startsWith = function (str){
    return this.slice(0, str.length) == str;
  };
}

The difference between substring and slice is basically that slice can take negative indexes, to manipulate characters from the end of the string, for example you could write the counterpart endsWith method by:

if (typeof String.prototype.endsWith != 'function') {
  String.prototype.endsWith = function (str){
    return this.slice(-str.length) == str;
  };
}
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52  
If the string is very long, this could be quite inefficient. –  Amir Jun 11 '10 at 16:24
4  
There is an efficient solution by @cobbal which only check the first bytes instead of the entire string. –  Shay Erlichmen Aug 23 '10 at 10:28
13  
@ben-weaver shows that @mark-byers' code is the fastest on most browsers (data.lastIndexOf(str, 0) === 0) –  JasonWoof May 14 '11 at 6:59
6  
@Eonil: indexOf is inefficient because it will search the entire string for the substring, but we only need to know whether the substring at the first index matches or not. –  Felix Kling Aug 21 '11 at 18:41
2  
@Felix I got it. Thanks :) –  Eonil Aug 22 '11 at 5:12
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Here's another alternative:

data.lastIndexOf(str, 0) === 0
  • It doesn't check the entire string.
  • It doesn't create a new temporary string and then immediately discard it.
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16  
mhenry1384: That's why the second parameter of lastIndexOf tells it to start the search at index 0 -- it will only look there. –  Hound Jun 8 '11 at 12:18
4  
Can we also assume an efficient implementation of endsWith would be data.indexOf(str,this.length-str.length) === this.length-str.length? –  chaiguy Jul 28 '11 at 19:27
10  
@Montagist Your assertion that multiple occurrences of the search string within the string being searched will cause this invocation to return false is incorrect. The second parameter is the initial search index which when not provided defaults to string.length and the function walks it backwards to 0. By setting this parameter to 0, this function will only look at the zeroth position in the string for a match. –  Kyle W. Cartmell Sep 24 '11 at 19:44
9  
+1. Very smart solution –  Zo72 Oct 4 '11 at 13:49
3  
@chaiguy: It's not even necessary to compare the result with this specific index. Either indexOf finds the string or it doesn't. So >= 0 or !== -1 should suffice. The same goes for lastIndexOf of course. –  Robert Nov 1 '12 at 11:09
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data.substring(0, input.length) === input
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10  
This is most efficient –  Silas Hansen Sep 21 '10 at 8:39
10  
@Silas Hansen: I disagree, see @Mark Byers . –  ANeves Jul 14 '11 at 11:34
2  
@ANeves I suspect it strongly depends on the browser and the data used. See Ben Weaver's answer for actual measurements. On the browser I'm running currently (Chrome 12.0.742 on Windows) substring wins for success and prepared regex wins for failure. –  cobbal Jul 14 '11 at 17:11
3  
@cobbal Maybe. But .lastIndexOf(input, 0) compares the first N chars, whereas .substring(0, input.length) === input counts N, substrings the data to N length, and then compares those N chars. Unless there is code optimization, this second version cannot be faster than the other. Don't get me wrong though, I would never find by myself something better than you suggested. :) –  ANeves Jul 18 '11 at 9:19
10  
@ChrisMoschini, don't forget that Mark Byers' solution has lastIndexOf start at index 0, not the end. That tripped me up, too, initially. Still, checking what a string starts with is such a common task that JavaScript really ought to have a proper API for it, not all the idioms and alternatives you see on this page, however clever they are. –  Randall Cook Jan 29 '13 at 20:58
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Without the use of a helper function:

(/^He/).test('Hello world')
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Thanks! You da man! Solved my problem with just a line :) –  thandasoru Dec 29 '11 at 13:06
    
+1 For being the most elegant and compact solution. –  noamtm Jul 16 '13 at 10:51
4  
Note, however, that it gets uglier if the patten is not hardcoded. –  noamtm Jul 16 '13 at 10:53
    
@noamtm Actualy you are able to generate dynamic regex, although it wont be in one line, and will reduce a lot its performance. But you still can do it –  BernaMariano Sep 3 '13 at 22:05
4  
@BernaMariano hence "it gets uglier" :-) –  noamtm Sep 8 '13 at 14:19
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Here's a related JS Perf. Looks like lastIndexOf is a good cross-browser choice.

http://jsperf.com/js-startswith/6

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I am definitely using this. It performs very good on all versions of FF, Opera and Safari –  ajax333221 Feb 21 '12 at 19:59
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Here is a minor improvement to CMS's solution:

if(!String.prototype.startsWith){
    String.prototype.startsWith = function (str) {
        return !this.indexOf(str);
    }
}

"Hello World!".startsWith("He"); // true

 var data = "Hello world";
 var input = 'He';
 data.startsWith(input); // true

Checking whether the function already exists in case a future browser implements it in native code or if it is implemented by another library. For example, the Prototype Library implements this function already.

Using ! is slightly faster and more concise than " === 0" though not as readable.

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This could become a problem: If the implementation already in place behaves differently from my own this would break my application. –  Legate Jul 12 '11 at 9:20
2  
This has the O(N) problem discussed here stackoverflow.com/questions/646628/javascript-startswith/… –  Chris Moschini Jan 30 '13 at 7:52
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Also check out underscore.string.js. It comes with a bunch of useful string testing and manipulation methods.

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startsWith is in the ES 6 drafts and Gecko already has native support. Here's a shim for unsupporting browsers: https://github.com/paulmillr/es6-shim

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var str = 'he';

var data = 'hello world';

String.prototype.startsWith = function(s)
{
   if( this.indexOf(s) == 0 ) return true;
   return false;
}

if( data.startsWith(str) ) return true;
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var str = 'hol';
var data = 'hola mundo';
if (data.length >= str.length && data.substring(0, str.length) == str)
    return true;
else
    return false;
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If you are working with startsWith() and endsWith() then you have to be careful about leading spaces....here is the complete example....

var Str1 = " Your String Value Here.!! "; // Starts With & Ends With leading Spaces
var Str2 = Str1.trim();   // Removes All Spaces by using Trim() function Something like this --> "Your String Value Here.!!"

if (Str2.startsWith("Your")) // returns TRUE
if (Str2.endsWith("Here.!!")) // returns TRUE

if (Str1.startsWith("Your")) // returns FALSE due to the leading spaces…
if (Str1.endsWith("Here.!!")) // returns FALSE due to trailing spaces…

Hope it will helps you, cheers. !!

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Simplest solution:

data.indexOf(input) == 0

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It's quite an old question, but here is a version that doesn't create another string for comparison-

data.indexOf(input) === 0
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You can also return all members of an array that start with a string by creating your own prototype / extension to the the array prototype, aka

Array.prototype.mySearch = function (target) {
    if (typeof String.prototype.startsWith != 'function') {
        String.prototype.startsWith = function (str){
        return this.slice(0, str.length) == str;
      };
    }
    var retValues = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (this[i].startsWith(target)) { retValues.push(this[i]); }
    }
    return retValues;
};

And to use it:

var myArray = ['Hello', 'Helium', 'Hideout', 'Hamster'];
var myResult = myArray.mySearch('Hel');
// result -> Hello, Helium
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