Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In an Ant build.xml, I would like to be able to find any matches in all .html files using the following regex:

("|')((?!http://|#|mailto:|&|/)([^#\n\s\."])+?\.([^#\n\s"])+?)\1

Then, I want to list those matches of \2 in a file. Is this possible?

Final result, thanks to @bakoyaro:

    <echo message="Collecting appcache files" />
    <concat destFile="your_output_file">
        <fileset dir="./${dir.publish}">
            <include name="**/*.html"/>
        </fileset>
        <filterchain>
            <linecontainsregexp>
                <regexp pattern="(.)*?(&quot;|')((?!http://|\?|#|mailto:|\1)([^#\n\s\.&quot;'?])+?\.([^#\n\s&quot;'?])+?)\2" />
            </linecontainsregexp>
            <tokenfilter>
                <replaceregex pattern="(.)*?(&quot;|')((?!http://|\?|#|mailto:|\1)([^#\n\s\.&quot;'?])+?\.([^#\n\s&quot;'?])+?)\2" flags="g" replace="\1\2\3\2${line.separator}" />
            </tokenfilter>
            <linecontainsregexp>
                <regexp pattern="(.)*?(&quot;|')((?!http://|\?|#|mailto:|\1)([^#\n\s\.&quot;'?])+?\.([^#\n\s&quot;'?])+?)\2" />
            </linecontainsregexp>
            <tokenfilter>
                <replaceregex pattern="(.)*?(&quot;|')((?!http://|\?|#|mailto:|\1)([^#\n\s\.&quot;'?])+?\.([^#\n\s&quot;'?])+?)\2" flags="g" replace="\3" />
            </tokenfilter>
            <linecontainsregexp>
                <regexp pattern="((?!http://|\?|#|mailto:|\1)([^#\n\s\.&quot;'?])+?\.([^#\n\s&quot;'?])+?)" />
            </linecontainsregexp>
        </filterchain>
    </concat>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to do this using the Concat task with a nested FilterChain.

Something like this:

<concat destFile="your_output_file">
    <fileset dir="WebContent">
        <include name="**/*.html"/>
    </fileset>
    <filterchain>
        <linecontainsregexp>
            <regexp pattern="your_pattern_to_match" />
        </linecontainsregexp>
        <tokenfilter>
            <replaceregex pattern="your_pattern_to_extract" replace="output_required" />
        </tokenfilter>
    </filterchain>
</concat>
share|improve this answer
    
This will actually "get" the matched tokens so I can output them? –  Jason T Featheringham Jun 24 '11 at 20:56
1  
This will output the matches to the destFile specified in the concat task. Alternatively, if you use concat without a destFile attribute, it will output to the console. Looks like it was useful for you, as your solution used all the elements: concat, filterchain, linecontainsregexp, tokenfilter. –  sudocode Jun 27 '11 at 9:02
    
Yes, and apparently I checked the wrong answer. I really hate how SO moves them all around. –  Jason T Featheringham Jun 27 '11 at 21:46

Here is a snippet that may help, it will create a .zip file containing any of the files that match your regex. I use it to examine my builds to ensure that all of the ant tokens were replaced.

<zip destfile="${your_file_name}" update="true" whenempty="skip">
            <fileset dir="${your_search_directory}">
                    <!-- your file pattern -->
                    <include name="**/*.html" />
                    <!-- this will destroy an executable file. best to exclude them -->
                <exclude name="**/*.jar" />
                <containsregexp expression="your_regex_to_match" />
            </fileset>
        </zip>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not looking to replace--only collect the tokens and place the tokens in a text file. –  Jason T Featheringham Jun 24 '11 at 21:23
    
With a few modifications, this worked great! Thanks SO much for your expertise. This has really gotten me more interested in Ant. –  Jason T Featheringham Jun 25 '11 at 6:21
    
Glad it worked out for you! –  bakoyaro Jun 27 '11 at 13:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.