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I have a problem related to MySQL. I have a table, let's called it "students" with 3 columns: id, name, and age. I have an index name Index_2 - kind UNIGUE on columns name and age.

CREATE TABLE bedrock.students (
id INTEGER UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL, age INTEGER UNSIGNED NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id), UNIQUE INDEX Index_2 USING BTREE(name, age) ) ENGINE = InnoDB;

I tried this insert option:

insert into students (id, name, age) values (1, 'Ane', 23);

which works ok. Than I've tried this one (see Ané - e acute):

insert into students (id, name, age) values (2, 'Ané', 23);

and I receive this error message:

"Duplicate entry 'Ané-23' for key 'Index_2'"

MySQL somehow do not make any distinction between "Ane" and "Ané". How I can resolve this and why this is happening ?

Charset for table students is "utf8" and collation is "utf8_general_ci".

ALTER TABLE students CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

Thanks you.

Later edit1: @Crozin:

I've changed to use collation utf8_bin:

ALTER TABLE students CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin;

but I receive the same error...

But If I create the table from start with charset utf8 and collation utf8_bin, like this:

CREATE TABLE students2 ( id INTEGER UNSIGNED AUTO_INCREMENT, name VARCHAR(45), age VARCHAR(45), PRIMARY KEY (id),
UNIQUE INDEX Index_2 USING BTREE(name, age) ) ENGINE = InnoDB CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin;

both below insert commands works ok:

insert into students2 (id, name, age) values (1, 'Ane', 23); // works ok

insert into students2 (id, name, age) values (2, 'Ané', 23); // works ok

This seems to be very weird....

Later edit 2:

I saw another answer here ... I'm not sure if the user deleted or it get lost ... :| I was just testing it:

The user wrote that first he created 3 tables with 3 different charsets:

CREATE TABLE utf8_bin ( id int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(45) COLLATE utf8_bin NOT NULL, age int(10) unsigned NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id), UNIQUE KEY Index_2 (name,age) USING BTREE ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_bin;

CREATE TABLE utf8_unicode_ci (
id int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(45) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
age int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (id), UNIQUE KEY Index_2 (name,age) USING BTREE ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;

CREATE TABLE utf8_general_ci (
id int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(45) COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL,
age int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (id), UNIQUE KEY Index_2 (name,age) USING BTREE ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_general_ci;

The results of the user are:

Insert commands: INSERT INTO utf8_bin VALUES (1, 'Ane', 23), (2, 'Ané', 23); Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.02 sec) Records: 2 Duplicates: 0 Warnings: 0

INSERT INTO utf8_unicode_ci VALUES (1, 'Ane', 23), (2, 'Ané', 23); Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.01 sec) Records: 2 Duplicates: 0 Warnings: 0

INSERT INTO utf8_general_ci VALUES (1, 'Ane', 23), (2, 'Ané', 23); Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.01 sec) Records: 2 Duplicates: 0 Warnings: 0

Here are my results:

INSERT INTO utf8_bin VALUES (1, 'Ane', 23), (2, 'Ané', 23); //works ok INSERT INTO utf8_unicode_ci VALUES (1, 'Ane', 23), (2, 'Ané', 23); // Duplicate entry 'Ané-23' for key 'Index_2'

INSERT INTO utf8_general_ci VALUES (1, 'Ane', 23), (2, 'Ané', 23); //Duplicate entry 'Ané-23' for key 'Index_2'

I'm not sure why in his part this INSERT commands worked and for me doesn't worked ... He also wrote that he tested this on Mysql on Linux - has to do something with this ?! ... even I do not think so..

share|improve this question
    
Not related to your question, but it's never a good idea to have a unique key on a name field... Many people have the same name. What do you plan to do in that instance? That said, the fact you have created a unique key based on name and age would suggest a design decision..... –  Brendan Bullen Jun 24 '11 at 11:18
    
Hi Brendan, this is just an example, a fictive one - is not the same as I have in the project I work! I know is not ok to have an unique index on columns like 'name' and 'age'. I've choose this example (not a very intelligent one - I admin) instead choosing the real example which contains more then 10 columns.... –  Paul Jun 24 '11 at 12:40
    
That makes sense. –  Brendan Bullen Jun 24 '11 at 13:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

and collation is "utf8_general_ci".

And that's the answer. If you're using utf8_general_ci (actually it applies to all utf_..._[ci|cs]) collation then diacritics are bypassed in comarison, thus:

SELECT "e" = "é" AND "O" = "Ó" AND "ä" = "a"

Results in 1. Indexes also use collation.

If you want to distinguish between ą and a then use utf8_bin collation (keep in mind that it also distinguish between uppercase and lowercase characters).


By the way name and age don't guarantee any uniqueness.

share|improve this answer
    
I've aswered to your answer by updating the question - did not had enough space here. I've also added "Later edit 2" part. –  Paul Jun 24 '11 at 12:47
    
related to "name and age don't guarantee any uniqueness" please see my second comment for this question - as a response to Brendan. –  Paul Jun 24 '11 at 12:49
    
using collation utf_8 bin works fine - the only issue that I have is that is case-sensitive and I wanted to be case-insensitive - do you know a solution for this ? Thanks. –  Paul Jun 27 '11 at 9:54
    
@Paul: I'm afraid that there is no binary-like, case-insensitive collation. I guess you'll have to use two columns. First one for storing actual data and a second for string lowercased text with utf8_bin collation and unique index. It means that one column will store Ané and second one ané. All searches and comparisons should be performed then on the second column. –  Crozin Jun 27 '11 at 18:25

Change collation to latin1_german2_ci

checkout collation effects

share|improve this answer
    
Downvote: utf8_unicode_ci will cause the very same error. –  Crozin Jun 24 '11 at 11:25
    
@Shakti Singh: Using latin-based collation on Unicode-encoded might solve a problem in this particular case but it leads to dozens of new issues. –  Crozin Jun 24 '11 at 12:25
    
@Shakti Singh: I still consider this as a wrong answer. –  Crozin Jun 24 '11 at 12:37
    
For Charset utf8 I do not even have collation latin1_german2_ci. –  Paul Jun 24 '11 at 12:41
    
@Paul: Charset will become latin1 with the collation latin1_german2_ci –  Framework Jun 24 '11 at 12:42

I found that

ALTER TABLE students CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin;

did not work for me, as it didn't change the collation of existing columns, as can be seen in the results of this query:

SHOW FULL COLUMNS from students;

However, the following query did the job and converted existing columns to utf8_bin collation:

ALTER TABLE students CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin;

(notice the "CONVERT TO")

share|improve this answer

I know this question is somewhat old now, but what I had to do was remove the primary key on my table and use a regular index, instead. It seems that MySQL doesn't honor utf8_bin's collation in primary keys. I'm using MySQL 5.5.

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