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I want to teach Vim how to open Perl 5 modules from names like File::Find. I already have a wrapper script written in Perl 5 that handles the commandline (see below), but I would like to be able to say things like :tabe File::Find and have it really execute :tabe /home/cowens/apps/perlbrew/perls/perl-5.14.0/lib/5.14.0/File/Find.pm.

My current plan is to somehow use autocmd BufNewFile and/or autocmd BufPreRead, but I can't figure out how to switch the file name.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @files = @ARGV;
for my $file (@files) {
    next if -f $file; #skip files that really exist

    #convert from module name to module file
    (my $module = $file) =~ s{::}{/}g;
    $module .= ".pm";

    #look for module in the include paths
    for my $dir (@INC) {
        my $candidate = "$dir/$module";
        if (-f $candidate) {
            $file = $candidate;
            last;
        }
    }
}

#replace this script with vim
exec "vim", "-p", @files;
share|improve this question
2  
Have you looked at and dismissed ctags? –  searlea Jun 24 '11 at 11:43
    
@searlea No, I have never used ctags, I assume I can say :help ctags in Vim to learn more? –  Chas. Owens Jun 24 '11 at 11:47
    
Yes... vim's got help on it. It's help with jumping directly from function references to source definitions etc, going well beyond simply starting or opening a file based on a module name. –  searlea Jun 24 '11 at 11:50
    
@searlea It looks like ctags is a way to execute a command based on text in the current buffer. It also looks like it requires an index that must be modified everytime you add a file (to map the string to the command). This isn't really what I am looking for. I want to be able to edit any file, not just files included in the current file. One problem with ctags is that the file I get when I say :tabe Foo could change depending on my environment. This could probably be fixed by a complex enough command, but then why wouldn't I just use that command? –  Chas. Owens Jun 24 '11 at 11:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Doing

:verbose au BufReadCmd

Will tell you how other types of plugins do this (e.g. zip, netrw, fugitive). Sample output that should give you plenty of ideas:

zip  BufReadCmd
    zipfile:* call zip#Read(expand("<amatch>"), 1)
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vim73\plugin\zipPlugin.vim
    *.zip     call zip#Browse(expand("<amatch>"))
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vim73\plugin\zipPlugin.vim

Network  BufReadCmd
    ftp://*   exe "silent doau BufReadPre ".fnameescape(expand("<amatch>"))|call netrw#Nread(2,expand("<amatch>"))|exe "silent doau BufReadPost ".fnameescape(expand("<amatch>"))
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vim73\plugin\netrwPlugin.vim
    http://*  exe "silent doau BufReadPre ".fnameescape(expand("<amatch>"))|call netrw#Nread(2,expand("<amatch>"))|exe "silent doau BufReadPost ".fnameescape(expand("<amatch>"))
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vim73\plugin\netrwPlugin.vim

fugitive_files  BufReadCmd
    *.git/index
              exe s:BufReadIndex()
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vimfiles\plugin\fugitive.vim
    *.git/*index*.lock
              exe s:BufReadIndex()
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vimfiles\plugin\fugitive.vim
    fugitive://**//[0-3]/**
              exe s:BufReadIndexFile()
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vimfiles\plugin\fugitive.vim
    fugitive://**//[0-9a-f][0-9a-f]*
              exe s:BufReadObject()
    Last set from C:\Program Files\Vim\vimfiles\plugin\fugitive.vim
share|improve this answer
    
This looks very promising. –  Chas. Owens Jun 24 '11 at 12:05

Consider using ctags. If you're able to run the ctags process over your source code, you should be able to get to a point where you simply do:

vim -t File::Find

Vim has information about this (:help vim) I think ctags probably goes well beyond what you're trying to do, allowing you to jump from the middle of one source file to the original function definition in another.

share|improve this answer
    
Vim already knows how do most of this for Perl 5. I can hit gF while over a module name and have it open that module. The problem comes when I am in file A and want to open File B, but File A contains no references to File B. –  Chas. Owens Jun 24 '11 at 12:03
1  
That's be :tag B then –  searlea Jun 24 '11 at 18:21
    
Hmm, that does have some merit then, but I would still have to keep an index of files->commands up-to-date. The problem there is that I have more than one sandbox. So when I am in sandbox A, I want A/A and A/B, but when I am in sandbox B, I want B/A and B/B. I can change which sandbox I am using by changing directory and sourcing an environment file. If I were to switch to using ctags, I would need to reindex. That might not be that painful, and it sounds like it would be less work than getting the autocmds to work properly. I am going to give it a try. –  Chas. Owens Jun 24 '11 at 20:55
    
I don't think you need to reindex, I believe you can use more than one tags file... See :help 'tags' and :help file-searching to set things up so you automatically pick a different tags file based on which sandbox you're in (e.g. by crawling up the directory tree from your current source file.) –  searlea Jun 24 '11 at 21:00
1  
The key to using ctags is just to keep your indices local to the thing they're indexing. You can have multiple tags files listed in your vimrc and you can change the variables (automatically) when changing buffers if you want to search in different orders. Changing environment variables requires restarting vim to take effect so it's best (IMO) to set things up so that the settings "know" the current sandbox. (This is exactly what I do so that I use the tags file associated with the project that I'm currently in.) –  dash-tom-bang Dec 11 '12 at 3:21

For opening those files manually I would recommend to use :find and :tabfind commands instead of :edit and :tabedit respectively. The difference between these two pairs of commands is that the former ones look for a file not only in the current path, but also in directories listed in path option (see :help 'path'). If you add your Perl @INC directories to Vim path option, you can quickly locate a module file by using :find or :tabfind commands. For example, to open a new tab page and edit File::Find module file in you can type

:tabfind File/Find.pm

(You don't have to type the whole sub-path manually since :find and :tabfind completion takes the current path value into account.)

To locating those files automatically by module name using gf, ^Wf, ^Wgf, you need to additionally change (either with filetype plugin or autocommand) the following options for Perl files.

:set isfname+=:
:set suffixesadd+=.pm
:set includeexpr=substitute(v:fname,'::','/','g')

After these options (as well as path option containing Perl @INC directories) are set, you can easily open module files using gf-like commands on corresponding module names.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, that is a non-starter. The trick here isn't just the path, it is also the conversion from File::Find to File/Find.pm. –  Chas. Owens Jun 24 '11 at 12:55
    
@Chas.: You can easily achieve this behavior using Vim built-in mechanisms. See the updated answer. –  ib. Jun 25 '11 at 1:42
    
Again, I want to be able to say :tabe File::Find or something like it. gf already finds Perl modules without a problem in Vim 7. I want to be editing file A then realize I need to be editing file B and be able to open it even though file B is not mentioned anywhere in file A. I often get module names from other sources (like email, IM, logs, etc.) and I am tired of having to make the changes manually. –  Chas. Owens Jun 25 '11 at 3:54

Lazy solution based on sehe's answer below. Current problems:

  1. the file it writes is the original name, not the munged name
  2. it looks like the autocommands that set the filetype are running too soon, not at all, or are confused.
  3. it is using an external command to do the work
  4. it is specific to the munging I want (i.e. it is not general)

When I have more downtime, I hope to fix all of the above and turn it into a plugin.

in .vimrc

autocmd BufReadCmd * r!cat_perl %

in cat_perl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

sub cat {
    my $file = shift;
    open my $fh, "<", $file
        or die "could not open $file: $!";
    print while <$fh>;
    exit;
}

my $file = shift;

cat $file if -f $file;

#convert from module name to module file
(my $module = $file) =~ s{::}{/}g;
$module .= ".pm";

#look for module in the include paths
for my $dir (@INC) {
    my $candidate = "$dir/$module";
    cat $candidate if -f $candidate;
}
print "";
share|improve this answer

This may actually be possible with vim's gf command (go to file).

In your code, if you see a string like File::Find, place your cursor over it and in normal mode type gf. For me, that immediately takes me to the File::Find package.

I think this is native as part of the perl filetype libraries because it works for me when executing vim with --noplugin.

share|improve this answer
    
It is and it doesn't do what I want. I want to be able to open any file, not just files that happen to be referenced in the current file. –  Chas. Owens Jun 24 '11 at 13:28

Here's a working example showing how to use the BufReadCmd autocmd to edit a file other than the one specified (in this case editing a corresponding .scss file when you open a .css file).

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