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The general question is how to return additional information from methods, beside the actual result of the computation. But I want, that this information can silently be ignored.

Take for example the method dropWhile on Iterator. The returned result is the mutated iterator. But maybe sometimes I might be interested in the number of elements dropped.

In the case of dropWhile, this information could be generated externally by adding an index to the iterator and calculating the number of dropped steps afterwards. But in general this is not possible.

I simple solution is to return a tuple with the actual result and optional information. But then I need to handle the tuple whenever I call the method - even if I'm not interested in the optional information.

So the question is, whether there is some clever way of gathering such optional information?

Maybe through Option[X => Unit] parameters with call-back functions that default to None? Is there something more clever?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Just my two cents here…

You could declare this:

case class RichResult[+A, +B](val result: A, val info: B)

with an implicit conversion to A:

implicit def unwrapRichResult[A, B](richResult: RichResult[A, B]): A = richResult.result

Then:

def someMethod: RichResult[Int, String] = /* ... */

val richRes = someMethod
val res: Int = someMethod
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Thought about that. The drawback is that you need the type annotation when it can't infer A. –  ziggystar Jun 24 '11 at 12:16
    
You need the type annotation anyway if you're assigning to a val and want to benefit from the implicit conversion. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Jun 24 '11 at 17:09
    
By the way, you could also use a type ascription: val res = someMethod: Int. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Jun 24 '11 at 23:25
    
It would be nicer if I had to annotate/ascribe the optional type. Then I'd consider this an solution to my problem. –  ziggystar Jun 25 '11 at 5:23
1  
Does that work if A <: B or vice versa? –  huynhjl Jun 26 '11 at 4:35

You want dropWhileM with the State monad threading a counter through the computation.

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Here is my take (with some edits with a more realistic example):

package info {
  trait Info[T] { var data: Option[T] }
  object Info {
    implicit def makeInfo[T]: Info[T] = new Info[T] { 
      var data: Option[T] = None 
    }
  }
}

Then suppose your original method (and use case) is implemented like this:

object Test extends App {
  def dropCounterIterator[A](iter: Iterator[A]) = new Iterator[A] {
    def hasNext = iter.hasNext
    def next() = iter.next()
    override def dropWhile(p: (A) => Boolean): Iterator[A] = {
      var count = 0
      var current: Option[A] = None
      while (hasNext && p({current = Some(next()); current.get})) { count += 1 }
      current match {
        case Some(a) => Iterator.single(a) ++ this
        case None => Iterator.empty
      }
    }
  }

  val i = dropCounterIterator(Iterator.from(1))
  val ii = i.dropWhile(_ < 10)
  println(ii.next())
}

To provide and get access to the info, the code would be modified only slightly:

import info.Info // line added

object Test extends App {
  def dropCounterIterator[A](iter: Iterator[A]) = new Iterator[A] {
    def hasNext = iter.hasNext
    def next() = iter.next()
    // note overloaded variant because of extra parameter list, not overriden
    def dropWhile(p: (A) => Boolean)(implicit info: Info[Int]): Iterator[A] = {
      var count = 0
      var current: Option[A] = None
      while (hasNext && p({current = Some(next()); current.get})) { count += 1 }
      info.data = Some(count) // line added here
      current match {
        case Some(a) => Iterator.single(a) ++ this
        case None => Iterator.empty
      }
    }
  }

  val i = dropCounterIterator(Iterator.from(1))
  val info = implicitly[Info[Int]] // line added here
  val ii = i.dropWhile((x: Int) => x < 10)(info) // line modified
  println(ii.next())
  println(info.data.get) // line added here
}

Note that for some reason the type inference is affected and I had to annotate the type of the function passed to dropWhile.

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It's definitely not more clever, but you could just create a method that drops the additional information.

def removeCharWithCount(str: String, x: Char): (String, Int) =
  (str.replace(x.toString, ""), str.count(x ==))

// alias that drops the additional return information
def removeChar(str: String, x: Char): String =
  removeCharWithCount(str, x)._1
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