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i have a child Class, that needs an Annotation, that is declared in the Parent class removed. What is the best way to do this?

public class Parent

@MyAnnoation
String foobar;

}


public class Child extends Parent {
//here I only want to remove the @MyAnnotation from String foobar;

}

What I want to avoid is, "overriding" the member

 public class Child extends Parent {

 String foobar;

 }

as this has several disadvantages (as it "covers" the underlaying parent member = this.foobar can be different to super.foobar)...

1.) Is there an easy way of removing an annotation from a Parent Class in the Subclass (here Child)?

2.) What is the official way to remove annotations in a Subclass?

Thanks very much! Markus

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why would you wanna do that? –  Suraj Chandran Jun 24 '11 at 12:04
    
if you want to do something like this than you probably should have another look at your design. I think that if there is a way to remove a runtime annotation than that would not be recommended :) –  Simeon Jun 24 '11 at 12:08
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to do something like this than you probably should have another look at your design.

I think that if there is a way to remove a runtime annotation than that would not be recommended, because you would be remove a part of a class definition. Like removing a member access modifier for instance.

That can have unexpected results on your logic since other code might rely on these definitions to make runtime decisions.

If you need to modify a class definition during runtime than this class should probably not be defined in such a way in the first place.

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+1 - Extending because a class is "a bit like" rather than "is a" is wrong. –  Qwerky Jun 24 '11 at 12:20
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