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I know that perl can't detect the recursive reference as :

$a = \$a;

$a will never be GCed in this case.

What about :

@a = ({1,2,3}, [1,2,3]);

Will the anonymous {1,2,3} and [1,2,3] be collected when @a goes out of scope?

How to prove it's yes or no?

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2  
Tangential to the question, but {1, 2, 3} will trigger an Odd number of elements in anonymous hash message under use warnings. –  Michael Carman Jun 24 '11 at 13:34
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When @a = ({1,2,3}, [1,2,3]); goes out of scope, its reference count will be reduced by one*.

When the reference count of @a reaches zero, the reference count of its values will be reduced by one, and it will be freed.

When the reference count of $a[0] (a reference to a hash) reaches zero, the reference count of the referenced hash will be reduced by one, and it will be freed.

When the reference count of the anonymous hash reaches zero, the reference count of the its values will be reduced by one, and it will be freed.

When the reference count of one of the anonymous's hash's values reaches zero, the reference count of the its values will be reduced by one, and it will be freed.

Same goes for $a[1], the array it references and the values of that array.

You can "prove" this by using objects with destructors.

$ perl -E'
   package X {
      sub new { my ($c,$n) = @_; bless(\$n, $c) }
      DESTROY { say ${$_[0]}; }
   }
   {
      my @a = (
         { a => X->new(1), b => X->new(2) },
         [ X->new(3), X->new(4) ],
      );
      say "Before end of scope";
   }
   say "After end of scope";
'
Before end of scope
4
3
2
1
After end of scope

* — Actual implementation differs as an optimisation.

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So the anonymous hash/array will be collected as soon as @a in my example? –  compile-fan Jun 24 '11 at 15:24
    
@compile-fan, Yes. See the update. –  ikegami Jun 24 '11 at 15:25
    
Note: package X { ... } requires 5.14. { package X; ... } is an alternative. –  ikegami Jun 24 '11 at 15:41
    
what's the difference? –  compile-fan Jun 24 '11 at 15:46
    
@compile-fan, package X { ... } requires 5.14. The other doesn't. –  ikegami Jun 24 '11 at 21:36
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Actually when an array/hash goes out of scope,its values(the reference in keys are just taken as string so won't impact the refcount) will decrease their refcount,and if reaches 0,the operation will performe recursively.

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Perl can garbage-collect circular references if you "weaken" them using Scalar::Util's weaken function:

weaken REF
    REF will be turned into a weak reference. This means that it will
    not hold a reference count on the object it references. Also when
    the reference count on that object reaches zero, REF will be set to
    undef.

As far as garbage-collecting things that have gone out of scope, there's no one answer. It depends on your operating system and how perl was compiled. It's not something you should generally be worried about. perlfaq3 has a couple of relevant entries:

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you didn't answer my question. –  compile-fan Jun 24 '11 at 13:45
    
It's not something you should generally worry about, and it's good to pretend that the details are vague and unknowable — but in practice Perl GC is entirely deterministic, and basically it destroys everything that's unreferenced at the end of every scope :) –  hobbs Jun 24 '11 at 14:10
    
To add to what hobbs said, scope only determines where a variable name is usable. Reference counting determines the duration (i.e. lifespan). Out of scope variables can be accessed via references and last as long as any (non-weakened) references exist. Also note that just because a variable has been destroyed the memory it used won't necessarily be returned to the operating system. –  Michael Carman Jun 24 '11 at 14:55
    
so you mean anonymous array/hash won't be destroyed as soon as @a? –  compile-fan Jun 24 '11 at 15:21
    
@compile-fan: Not if there are external references to them. ikegami's answer walks through the details step-by-step. –  Michael Carman Jun 24 '11 at 17:16
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Another way to prove that the inner elements will be GCed when out of scope:

use Scalar::Util 'weaken';

my $x;

{
    my @a = ({foo => 'bar'}, ['foo', 'bar']);

    $x = $a[1]; # ref to the inner array
    weaken $x; # weaken the ref, so it doesn't interfere with GC
    print "'$x->[1]'\n"; # show us what we got
}

print "'$x->[1]'\n"; # and now it's gone

Outputs:

'bar'
''

weaken REF

REF will be turned into a weak reference. This means that it will not hold a reference count on the object it references. Also when the reference count on that object reaches zero, REF will be set to undef.

This is useful for keeping copies of references , but you don't want to prevent the object being DESTROY-ed at its usual time.

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If there is nothing more referring the anonymous hash it will be collected.
This will give you a complete answer!

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