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Alright, so here's the portion of my code that is giving me a problem. What I want it ot do is to take in a grade, decide if it is a valid grade, and then keep asking for a valid number if it is not. However, it won't even enter the loop, so.... any advice? Ive been programming for a little bit but Im still pretty new, so extra explanations are great! Also this is my first time using booleans in a for loop.

for (bool b_valid=false; b_valid=false ; )
{
cin >> n_grade;
b_valid = true;
    if (n_grade>100 || n_grade<0)
        {
            cout << "Invalid grade: Re-enter a number between 0-100 : " << endl;
            cin >> n_grade;
            b_valid = false;
        }
}
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Are you saying that your program is telling you that it doesn't even enter into this for loop? Because that is what the question title says but I don't really understand your problem. –  ihtkwot Jun 24 '11 at 12:53
1  
is you are using gcc you should compile with -Wall –  Karoly Horvath Jun 24 '11 at 12:54
1  
If I enter 900, 90, 900, 90, 900, 90, 900, 90 (ad infinitum) the code would never terminate. You're throwing away half the input. –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 14:00
    
True, good eye! I was able to figure that out after I ran the program a few times though after switching the = to a ==! Thanks though! Also I noticed that after I re-enter the number if it is not 0-100 then I have another input that I have to do for no reason so I fixed that too! –  Samuraisoulification Jun 24 '11 at 14:13
    
If you read the warning you compiler generated it would have told you this was wrong. Make sure you compile with ZERO warnings (warnings are the compilers way of telling you you have logical errors in your code). Also turn the warning level higher than the default. –  Loki Astari Jun 24 '11 at 14:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Your condition is an assignment: b_valid=false. It will evaluate to false and the loop will never execute. You meant

for(bool b_valid = false; b_valid == false; )
                                 ^^^^ 

There is a coding style which mandates that the constant in comparison be the first argument, like if(false == b_valid). In this case, if you accidentally typed = , you'd get a compiler error. In any case many compiler give a warning in cases where you had written assignment where a boolean expression was expexted. Either yours wasn't as sofisticated, or you just ignored the warning.

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It's rare for a compiler to warn about this EXACT case. Usually the warning appears when the controlling condition involves an assignment and requires an implicit conversion to boolean. Here the condition already is boolean. –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 12:58
1  
Rant on: I DESPISE that programming standard. Truly despise it. On projects where I have influence over the standards, that rule is gone. On projects where I don't, I ignore that rule (and tell my team members to do the same) and let the reviewers be damned. Eventually the rule gets dropped. –  David Hammen Jun 24 '11 at 13:49
1  
@Ben: "Here the condition already is boolean": Here the variable already is boolean. Don't compare a boolean to either true or false. –  David Hammen Jun 24 '11 at 13:52
    
@David: I suspect that's why the warning has that logic -- no one accidentally assigns a boolean variable instead of comparing it to true or false, because no one compares it to true or false, they just test it. A reasonable assumption, except that many of the programmers making the error also don't understand that a boolean can be directly used as the condition, or don't know about the logical negation operator. –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 13:58
    
The coding style has been deprecated a decade ago (It is really horrible) It makes the code harder to read. ALL compilers generate a warning for this. Just set the compiler to compile to treat warnings as errors (becuase they truly are logical errors and need to be fixed) now your code will not compile when you miss this. –  Loki Astari Jun 24 '11 at 14:19

You used assignment in loop condition ('='), it should be '==':

for (bool b_valid=false; false==b_valid; )
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for( a; b; c ) { body; }

is the same (except for scope) as

a;
while (b) {
   body;
   c;
}

Let's do that for your code:

bool b_valid=false;
while (b_valid = false) { // uh-oh

We don't have to go any further. This is an assignment, not a comparison. It sets b_valid to false and then checks whether it's true. Since it never is, the loop never runs.

But what you really wanted here is a do/while loop:

bool b_valid;
do {
    cin >> n_grade;
    if ( n_grade>100 || n_grade<0 ) {
        cout << "Invalid grade: Re-enter a number between 0-100 : " << endl;
        // let the next pass through the loop re-read n_grade
        b_valid = false;
    }
    else {
        b_valid = true;
    }
} while (!b_valid);

A do-while loop always runs at least once.

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But in a for loop it will run once always too right? At least in the case of for (bool b_value: b_value == false ; ) Right? –  Samuraisoulification Jun 24 '11 at 13:00
1  
@Samurai: Right. And the controlling variable could be named rainbow and it would also work. Since all three loops are technically equivalent, the choice takes on an expressive component that documents the intent to future developers. In this case do-while is correct, because the intent is "do this; and repeat while the input is invalid". –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 13:17

The equality comparison operator is ==. Right now your condition is b_valid=false, which just returns false.

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I respectfully disagree with the other (woefully upvoted) answers.

Do not compare a boolean value to either true or false.

This is nonsensical, redundant and leads to errors (as in your case).

Simply test the value itself. That is, write ! b_valid.

Furthermore, using a for loop here is blatantly misleading. Use while instead:

while (! b_valid) {
    …
}
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3  
Absolute truth! –  vines Jun 24 '11 at 13:05
1  
using a while loop here is blatantly misleading (it's neither valid nor invalid until you test the first piece of data). Use do/while instead. –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 13:23
    
@Ben You could argue (I do …) that it’s invalid until valid input has been made. So by inference the default state is invalid. I don’t really see the advantage of the do…while here. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 24 '11 at 13:31
    
+1 (and +Inf if I could) for "Do not compare a boolean value to either true or false." –  David Hammen Jun 24 '11 at 13:51
    
+1 Totally agreed. –  James Kanze Jun 24 '11 at 14:03

= is the assignment operator
== is the comparison operator

So your for loop constraint is not checking anything...

Alternatively use a while loop:

bool b_valid = false;
cin >> n_grade;
while(!b_valid){
   if(n_grade>100 || n_grade<0) {
      b_valid = true;
   } else {
      cout << "Invalid grade: Re-enter a number between 0-100 : " << endl;
      cin >> n_grade;   
   }
}
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heh, popular question :) 6 answers while writing answer.... –  Hoof Jun 24 '11 at 13:02
    
There seems to be many suggestions to use a while loop. Is there a reason a while loop is better? –  Samuraisoulification Jun 24 '11 at 13:05
1  
Since it is designed to loop until a value becomes true, it is more fit than using a for loop... Even if you say it out loud, it makes more sense to use while rather than for :) –  Hoof Jun 24 '11 at 13:15

You could just refactor your code into a while loop. For example:

bool b_valid = false;
while( !b_valid )
{
    cin >> n_grade;
    b_valid = true;
    if (n_grade>100 || n_grade<0)
    {
        cout << "Invalid grade: Re-enter a number between 0-100 : " << endl;
        cin >> n_grade;
        b_valid = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there an added benifit to using a while loop compared to a for loop? –  Samuraisoulification Jun 24 '11 at 13:09
1  
This got the condition backward, the loop is supposed to repeat when the data is invalid, this one exits when its invalid. –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '11 at 13:18
    
Thanks Voigt, silly mistake. @Samurai the while loop just seems to be a bit cleaner for your particular situation. The for and the while loops can always be switched (pretty much always as I can't off the top of my head think of why couldn't switch them) and as @Ben Voigt noted you can also do a do...while loop to ensure that it executes at least once. –  ihtkwot Jun 24 '11 at 14:10

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