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I'm looking for a way to make my tests more clear, this is the problem:

public interface A
{

}

public interface B
{
    A GetA();
}

Now, if I want a stub on B, and a new instance everytime I call GetA, i do this:

[Test]
public void TestName()
{
     MockRepository mockery = new MockRepository();

     B b = mockery.Stub<B>();
     b.Stub(x => x.GetA()).Return(mockery.Stub<A>()).Repeat.Once();
     b.Stub(x => x.GetA()).Return(mockery.Stub<A>()).Repeat.Once();

     mockery.ReplayAll();

     Assert.IsFalse(ReferenceEquals(b.GetA(), b.GetA()));
}

Note that in assert I call GetA twice, and I have setup the results as a Repeat.Once() instead of Repeat.Twice();

If you run this test, it will pass, because the instances are different. Howerver, I don't find this code very clear this way. How do you make Rhino Mocks generate new instance on every call?

Note: In the past I've used many tricks like on every return using Do() to execute some code that changes the instance and such, but is there something like .GenerateNewInstance() or similar?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
[Test]
public void TestName()
{
      var b = MockRepository.GenerateStub<B>();
      b.Stub(x => x.GetA())
          .WhenCalled(x => x.ReturnValue = MockRepository.GenerateStub<A>());

      Assert.IsFalse(ReferenceEquals(b.GetA(), b.GetA()));
}

In some instances you must explicitly add the .Return() call, but the value will be overridden if you set ReturnValue in the WhenCalled delegate argument.

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Yes, that's it. Thank you –  Denis Biondic Jun 24 '11 at 21:57
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I've broken a lot of sweat on this issue. It can be done like described in my answer in this link, but I have come to the conclusion, that often it will be much easier skip Rhino, and make your own dummy implementation.

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Yeah, using Do() and Callback() is the way I solve these problems too, thx anyway, I just wanted to check if I'm missing something from the Rhino Mocks API –  Denis Biondic Jun 24 '11 at 14:23
    
I don't think you are missing anything. Rhino just seems fairly complicated when it comes to mocking complicated behaviour... which is understandable enough :o) –  Morten Jun 24 '11 at 14:27
    
You can invoke custom logic and override the return value by using the WhenCalled extension method. See my answer for an example. I've also added an answer to the question to which you included a link. –  Jay Jun 24 '11 at 17:10
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