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I have a class:

class TestClass
  def method1
  end

  def method2
  end

  def method3
  end
end

How can I get a list of my methods in this class (method1,method2,method3)?

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Skip to Pavling's answer. –  Droogans Aug 10 '13 at 22:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 40 down vote accepted

You actually want TestClass.instance_methods, unless you're interested in what TestClass itself can do.

class TestClass
  def method1
  end

  def method2
  end

  def method3
  end
end

TestClass.methods.grep(/method1/) # => []
TestClass.instance_methods.grep(/method1/) # => ["method1"]
TestClass.methods.grep(/new/) # => ["new"]

Or you can call methods (not instance_methods) on the object:

test_object = TestClass.new
test_object.methods.grep(/method1/) # => ["method1"]
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2  
Heh, you beat me to it by 47 seconds. +1 –  Phrogz Jun 24 '11 at 14:00
1  
When i try print TestClass.new.instance_methods, i get this error my_class.rb:10:in <main>: undefined method instance_methods for #<TestClass:0x96b9d20> (NoMethodError) –  Vladimir Tsukanov Jun 24 '11 at 14:04
    
You only need to do TestClass.new.methods. Maybe "it" was ambiguous in my answer. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 24 '11 at 14:07
    
Note that under Ruby 1.9+ the array of method names are symbols, not strings. –  Phrogz Jun 24 '11 at 14:08
1  
@Phrogz: Yes, but you're allowed to use regular expressions on them. You don't even summon Cthulhu! :) Though you would get [:method1] instead. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 24 '11 at 14:10
TestClass.methods(false) 

to get only methods that belong to that class only.

TestClass.instance_methods(false) would return the methods from your given example (since they are instance methods of TestClass).

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2  
This is great way to test if a class has polymorphed methods from a pseudo-Interface/Abstract base class without having to try and call the methods directly. –  Daniel Doezema Apr 19 '13 at 13:03
1  
This is the right answer for me, thanks a lot! –  Fire-Dragon-DoL Sep 11 '13 at 23:00
1  
This is the correct answer! –  mrbrdo Oct 24 '13 at 13:23
1  
Thanks this helped me a lot! :) –  Clone Nov 5 '13 at 20:57
TestClass.instance_methods

or without all the inherited methods

TestClass.instance_methods - Object.methods

(Was 'TestClass.methods - Object.methods')

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13  
or without inherited methods: TestClass.methods(false). –  sawa Jun 24 '11 at 13:23
1  
@sawa TestClass.methods(false) returns empty –  Vladimir Tsukanov Jun 24 '11 at 13:55
1  
This answer is wrong; the results will not include method1, method2, or method3, as those are methods of instances of the class, not methods of the TestClass object itself. –  Phrogz Jun 24 '11 at 14:02
1  
@Phrogz: Oops... yes, 'TestClass.instance_methods - Object.methods', or 'TestClass.new.methods - Object.methods'... that'll teach me for not firing up a console. Is it best for me to delete this answer, or edit it? –  Pavling Jun 24 '11 at 14:13
1  
@Pavling Definitely edit your answer to be correct. (Quickly, before the OP assigns the credit to someone else! :) –  Phrogz Jun 24 '11 at 14:16

You can get a more detailed list (e.g. structured by defining class) with gems like debugging or looksee.

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$ irb --simple-prompt

class TestClass
  def method1
  end

  def method2
  end

  def method3
  end
end

tc_list = TestClass.instance_methods(false)
#[:method1, :method2, :method3]
puts tc_list
#method1
#method2
#method3
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1  
This is too similar to other answers and adds no additional information or clarity. –  Substantial Sep 8 '14 at 6:06
1  
You faled to mention it is also very late. :D –  Douglas G. Allen Sep 12 '14 at 4:22

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