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I wrote following 2 ltrim functions (function which removes white-spaces from left side of the string):

1. (putting here this code to not get such code as an answer)

void ltrim(char * str, int size)
{
    char const *start = str;
    char const *end = start + size;
    for(;*start && (*start==' ' || *start=='\n' || *start=='\r' || *start=='\t');++start);

    while(start != end)
    {
        *str = *start;
        ++start;
        ++str;
    }
    *str='\0';
}

2.

void ltrim(char * str, int size)
{
    char const *start = str;
    char const *end = start + size;
    for(;*start && (*start==' ' || *start=='\n' || *start=='\r' || *start=='\t');++start);
    memcpy(str, start, end-start);
    *(str + (end - start)) = '\0';
}

Does second version safe?

P.S. I have tried and it works, but not sure that memcpy is safe in this case.

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Hint: check the isspace() function with prototype in <ctype.h> :) –  pmg Jun 24 '11 at 13:42
    
@pmg I don't need isspace. for me this 4 characters are ok to be checked. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 13:45
    
Other than strange (unicode) characters, isspace only accounts for '\f' and '\v' more ... and your code looks more beautiful: for (; *start && isspace((unsigned char)*start); ++start); –  pmg Jun 24 '11 at 13:50
1  
You could also simplify the check to *start && strchr(" \n\r\t", *start) –  sth Jun 24 '11 at 13:57
    
+1 for strchr @sth –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 13:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

When source and destination overlap you should use memmove rather than memcpy.

From the memcpy man page:

The memcpy() function copies n bytes from memory area src to memory area dest. The memory areas should not overlap. Use memmove(3) if the memory areas do overlap.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point. I didn't know about memmove. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 13:44
    
Also, this guy should check that start never goes beyond start+size, and that start != NULL. –  Blazes Jun 24 '11 at 13:44
    
@Blazes it is checked. Reread the code. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 13:49
    
Nope, sorry @Mihran, but start can go beyond size. size may not be the end of string - it may just be the place from where to trim. Consider 3 spaces at the start of a string: "[space][space][space]string"... ltrim(string, 2). The code will find the start at 3, going beyond size of 2. And, his while loop would crash the program. –  Blazes Jun 24 '11 at 14:13
    
@Blazes REALLY! See 3-th comment of answer bellow. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 15:02

Regarding "safe" - you missed one important case - a check that you don't overrun the buffer. Use that size parameter to bound the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Look at code again. It is checked (of course assuming that this function should get null terminated buffer). –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 13:47
    
That's the catch - what happens if it's not zero terminated? Or when size is less then number of characters before zero byte? You'd be lucky with a segfault :) –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jun 24 '11 at 13:50
    
@Nikolai this is not full code. Actually this ltrim is a member function of some class which manipulates the buffer, and takes care the buffer is null terminated and also keeps its size cached (so there is no need to pass size as parameter)! –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 13:57
    
Well, we didn't know that, did we? In any case, you keep saying "reread the code" - but the code you posted does not check str parameter for NULL value, nor size for being negative. That's hardly qualifies as "safe". If you just want to prove to everybody that your code is perfect, this is the wrong site. Listen to what people are saying, you'd do much better. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jun 24 '11 at 14:11
    
Agree @Nikolai my code have lots of issues. But if someone is asking question and posting code like int a = b; you don't tell him, that b should be declared and initialized, right? –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jun 24 '11 at 15:09
    memcpy(str, start, end-start);

If you memmove (see Paul R.'s answer) 1 more character, that extra character is the null terminator.

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