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I came across what I thought was a unique syntax that I've never seen before (I mostly come from a C++ background). I'm not sure what the code is below. My guess is that it's some sort of unique way of defining a struct, but if someone could clearly explain what they're doing here, that would be a great help!

static Foo f =
{

    .a = {DEFAULT_FOO},
    .b = DEFAULT_BAR,
    .c[0] = { 0 }

#ifdef BAR
    ,
    .c[1] = { 0 },
    .c[2] = { 0 }
#endif
};
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I JUST ran into this like a week ago. It's a GNU extension, I can't remember what it's called... –  Chris Jun 24 '11 at 13:58
2  
This form of initialisation is only available in C99, and possibly also as a gcc extension pre C99. –  Paul R Jun 24 '11 at 13:58
    
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is C99 initialization syntax.

Note that a final comma is ok in C99, and the snippet could have been written

static Foo f =
{
    .a = {DEFAULT_FOO},
    .b = DEFAULT_BAR,
    .c[0] = { 0 },
#ifdef BAR
    .c[1] = { 0 },
    .c[2] = { 0 },
#endif
};

Note comma after .c[0] and .c[2].

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The #ifdef is plain old conditional compiling: it makes the bottom two lines disappear if BAR is defined.

The .a = {DEFAULT_FOO} is the C99 initialization syntax, it provides an initial value for the field a of the structure.

The static, in C, makes the global variable f invisible to the linker, so it will not be available outside the current translation unit or collide with similar-named variables in other translation units.

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it's a labeled struct initialization, described here

the weird dangling comma just after the #ifdef is there just to make sure that there's a comma between elements but none at the end wether the last part is active or not.

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