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how i can click listening all span Tags? The task it so resolve it without frameworks

    var spancontainer = document.all.tags('span');
    spancontainer.onclick = function() {
        alert("hi");
    }
[...]
    <span>Hello</span><span>World</span>

in jQuery it would like:

$("span").click(function() {
    alert("hi");
});
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4 Answers

You could leverage event bubbling. Attach an event handler to the root and listen to click events:

document.onclick = function(event) {
    event = event || window.event; // IE specials
    var target = event.target || event.srcElement; // IE specials

    if(target.nodeName === "SPAN") {
        alert('hi');
    }
};

Now, this will not work if there are other elements inside a span and you want to capture the click events inside spans too. In this case, you have to traverse the DOM:

document.onclick = function(event) {
    event = event || window.event; // IE specials
    var target = event.target || event.srcElement; // IE specials

    while(target.nodeName !== "SPAN" && target !== null) {
        target = target.parentNode;
    }

    if(target) {
        alert('hi');
    }
};
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That would be equivalent to jQuery's live method, which he's not using in his example. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 24 '11 at 14:52
    
@Matthew: So? The question is how to listen to clicks on span tags. $("span").click is one example how to do this. There are several ways to achieve the effect. –  Felix Kling Jun 24 '11 at 14:57
    
There are two different effects. 1. Listeners on all the spans that currently exist. 2. Listeners on all the spans that exist now or in the future. Based on his .click example, it looks like he wants the former. Your code implements the latter. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 24 '11 at 15:00
    
@Matthew: I actually don't expect that the OP choose the jQuery example that carefully. I could also argue that he meant document.all.tags('span') to return some live spancontainer that magically applies the click handler to every element existing now and in the future. And in any way, better have two different approaches than three times the same ;) –  Felix Kling Jun 24 '11 at 15:08
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 var spans = document.getElementsByTagName('span');
 for(var i=spans.length-1; i>=0; i--){
    spans[i].onclick = function() {
        alert("hi");
    }
 }
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You can write for(var i=spans.length-1; i>=0; i--) as for(var i=spans.length; i--; ). –  Felix Kling Jun 24 '11 at 15:11
    
@Felix Kling Thanks for the advice. –  wong2 Jun 24 '11 at 15:13
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var click_alert = function() {
    alert("hi");
};
var spans = document.getElementsByTagName('span');
for(var i = 0; i < spans.length; i++)
{
  spans[i].addEventListener("click", click_alert, false);
}

You can write a wrapper that uses either addEventListener or attachEvent for broader compatibility.

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var spans = document.getElementsByTagName('span');
for(var i = 0; i < spans.length; i++)
{
  // ...
}
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