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I am writing some Javascript code using jQuery to display specially formatted widgets in a browser. I've had success, but now I'm working on refactoring my code for two reasons.

(1) I wish to be able to easily use the widget more than once and have a Javascript object referring to each one.
(2) I wish to do it the right way so that my code is totally reusable and doesn't little the global namespace with all sorts of objects and functions.

I'm having a scoping problem and I wish to fix the problem and improve my understanding of Javascript scope. I've condensed this problem down to a tiny code snippet that illustrates what I'm doing:

  function getMyObject() {
      var theObject = {
          doThis: function () { },
          doThat: function () { },
          combinations: {
              doThisTwice: function () { doThis(); doThis(); },
              doThatTwice: function () { doThat(); doThat(); }
          }
      };
      return theObject;
  }

  var myObject = getMyObject();
  myObject.combinations.doThisTwice();

I've declared a function that returns an object.

However, when I try to execute the function combinations.doThisTwice(), the program throws an error saying that doThis() is out of scope. How do I refer to the function doThis in the scope of combinations.doThisTwice?

Update: Thank you kindly for the answer to my question: Replace doThis() with theObject.doThis() inside the function doThisTwice(). This works, but I don't understand why.

I would have thought that the name theObject would not be valid until the end of the object declaration. I think I must misunderstand some fundamental aspect of Javascript... probably because of the C-like syntax.

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Yeah, JS is weird like that. Google for Javscript scope and closures. You'll have a better understanding of how scoping works. –  Mrchief Jun 24 '11 at 15:24
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to do:

function getMyObject() {
    var theObject = {
        doThis: function () { },
        doThat: function () { },
        combinations: {
            doThisTwice: function () { theObject.doThis(); theObject.doThis(); },
            doThatTwice: function () { theObject.doThat(); theObject.doThat(); }
        }
    };
    return theObject;
}

var myObject = getMyObject(); myObject.combinations.doThisTwice();

You reference 'theObject' from an outer scope to call the functions in an inner object.

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You beat me to it! –  Mrchief Jun 24 '11 at 15:10
    
I'm quick like that ;) –  John Kalberer Jun 24 '11 at 15:15
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doThis is not defined in the functions scope, so it will traverse up the scope chain, but not find it.

You can reference it by

theObject.doThis();

However, more readable might be if you define your function like this:

  function getMyObject() {
      function doThis() {};
      function doThat() {};

      var theObject = {
          doThis: doThis,
          doThat: doThat,
          combinations: {
              doThisTwice: function () { doThis(); doThis(); },
              doThatTwice: function () { doThat(); doThat(); }
          }
      };
      return theObject;
  }

But in this case, whenever you change doThis from the outside, doThisTwice will still reference the original function.

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In doThisTwice, use theObject.doThis(); instead of doThis();

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