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I have an interface, which in this example we'll call IMagicPerson

public interface class IMagicPerson : IPerson
{
    IEnumerable<MagicPower> Powers { get; }
}

A few things inherit IMagicPerson, and then some other classes derive from them too, and so on, causing some pretty long derivative hierarchy. Each of these needs to be able to declare some of these powers, but must also use powers from the derived class.

I've played around with various ways of doing this. I've used:

  • A MagicPowerCollection class that can enumerate through multiple MagicPower enumerators as if it were one enumerator (using yield return statements) and using this to add a private static MagicPower[] to base.Powers
  • Using another constructor of the MagicPowerCollection that can add single Powers to the end of the enumerator (again, using yield returns)

But the way I'd really prefer to go about this would be by

  • Overloading the + operator of IEnumerable to allow adding more enumerators or single Powers

Is this a bad way to do it? I think it looks quite nice. For example, I could have:

public class Wizard : IMagicPerson
{
    public override IEnumerable<MagicPower> Powers
    {
        get
        {
            AllPowers.AntiGravity + AllPowers.BroomStick;
            //note: AllPowers, in this example, is a static class and all the properties return a MagicPower or type derived from MagicPower
        }
    }
}

public class EvilWizard : Wizard
{
    public override IEnumerable<MagicPower> Powers
    {
        get
        {
            return base.Powers + AllPowers.InstantDeath + AllPowers.MindControl;
        }
    }
}

So, where and how would I overload the + operator in such a way? I need to be able to add a MagicPower to either an enumerator, or to another MagicPower. Both of which will return an IEnumerator<MagicPower>.

I'll also accept other suggestions on other ways of achieving this, which don't including overloading this operator.

Notes:

Bare in mind I'm using C# 2.0, so extension methods won't work (although I'm strongly considering upgrading this server just for this).

Another complication is that although the powers are usually the same for each type of MagicPerson, there are also some powers that can only used in certain situations (for example, some Wizards can't use powers in the Muggle world :D). I'm not asking how to do this, I can just use if statements or add these properties somewhere else. Just letting people know that a completely static solution won't work.

Another thing to bare in mind is that I do not have access to the IMagicPerson interface, so I can't even get the property to return a new class that inherits IEnumerable and put the overloaded operators in there (or can I?)

Thanks!!

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If I saw that syntax in a piece of code, I would have no idea what it is trying to achieve. I don't think it is worth spending to making this new syntax work if it needs to be explained to people that might see the code late. –  unholysampler Jun 24 '11 at 15:19
    
This is one of the reasons I asked if this was 'bad', and said that I'll accept other solutions that don't include overloading the operator. How would you achieve this? –  Connell Watkins Jun 24 '11 at 15:25
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is completely impossible to override an operator on an interface, in any version.

You should make a static method that takes a params IEnumerable<T>[] and yield returns all of them using a double-foreach.

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However I do own the MagicPower class, which I can override the operators for? Also, your solution does exactly the same as the MagicPowerCollection class I gave in the question as an example. This didn't really work because of the reason I gave in the notes section at the bottom of the question. –  Connell Watkins Jun 24 '11 at 15:18
    
Well, I meant to use a iterator method rather than a class. I don't see why this wouldn't work; your second note is unclear. –  SLaks Jun 24 '11 at 15:22
    
A static method is much cleaner than a whole new class. Sorry that the note is unclear (couldn't think of a better way to word it). In your solution, I'd have to declare another enumerator for the powers of that class somewhere else, which previously I did as a static method, however I could do return CombinePowers(base.Powers, GetMyPowers()) and create GetMyPowers for every class? –  Connell Watkins Jun 24 '11 at 15:38
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To suggest an answer to my own question:

I could create a base class for each magic person:

public abstract class MagicPerson : IMagicPerson
{
    protected List<MagicPower> powers;

    public IEnumerable<MagicPower> Powers { get { return powers; } }
}

Then add to this powers list in the constructors of the derived classes.

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Does anyone know if this will use more resources than yield return statements? –  Connell Watkins Jun 24 '11 at 15:44
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