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I need to write a Silverlight application that allows our users to enter information to produce legal contracts. There are 5 to 7 different multipage documents with 15 to 20 input fields requiring text boxes, drop down lists, and some rich text formatting boxes, etc. When the user finishes their input, a Word template will pick up the information from the database to produce the finished, well formatted document.

Requirements:

    Silverlight (we do have the Telerik control suite)
    I'd like the Silverlight form to look(mimic) the actual contract as much as possible.
    I'd like the form to be easily updated, so when the Word template is revised it can be reflected in the form quickly or with minimal effort.

Questions:

    What is a solid way to do this?
    Is there any controls out there that are perfect for this type work?
    Is there a way to make a Telerik/Crystal report that takes Input? (that seems like it might solve many of the obstacles)
share|improve this question
    
Why is Silverlight a requirement? That seems like poor software design to me. Your implementation technology should never be a requirement, rather you should always choose the implementation technology(-y+ies) that does the best job of meeting all of your actual business requirements. – Brian Driscoll Jun 24 '11 at 15:20
    
I'd rather be using InfoPath piped to a SharePoint server, but that simply isn't what our infrastructure is. It would be quite a bit of fun if I could always choose what technology I use for a project, but I think most people work under the constraints of what their businesses infrastructure dictates. – MongooseNX Jun 24 '11 at 18:38
    
Ah, yes, understood. I stopped working in-house jobs years ago because I realized that decision makers suck at making long-term decisions. Anyway, I would think that using an interactive PDF would meet your requirements quite nicely. – Brian Driscoll Jun 27 '11 at 12:32

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