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This would be pretty straight forward if I knew the types at compile time or if it was a generic parameter, because I could do something like myArray.Cast<T>() But what I actually have is essentially this. I do not have a known type or generic parameter. I have a System.Type variable.

// could actually be anything else
Type myType = typeof(string);  

// i already know all the elements are the correct types
object[] myArray = new object[] { "foo", "bar" }; 

Is there some kind of reflection magic I can do to get a string[] reference containing the same data? (where string isn't known at compile time)

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Why do you want to do that? If you know the type only at runtime, you would have to have that reference as some more general type anyway. –  svick Jun 24 '11 at 16:13
    
I am trying to assign the array to a property on an object that I am constructing using reflection. The end use of this is an object mapper that can translate between different class hierarchies that are identical, but in different namespaces. –  recursive Jun 24 '11 at 16:17
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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's not really a cast as such (I'm allocating a new array and copying the original), but maybe this can help you out?

Type myType = typeof(string);
object[] myArray = new object[] { "foo", "bar" };

Array destinationArray = Array.CreateInstance(myType, myArray.Length);
Array.Copy(myArray, destinationArray, myArray.Length);

In this code, destinationArray will be an instance of string[] (or an array of whatever type myType was).

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1  
I know I was asking for a cast in the original question, but this is basically exactly what I actually wanted. Array.CreatInstance() was the part I was missing. –  recursive Jun 24 '11 at 17:47
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You can't perform such a cast, because the arrays object[] and string[] are actually different types and are not convertible. However, if you wanted to pass different such types to a function, just make the parameter IEnumerable. You can then pass an array of any type, list of any type, etc.

    // Make an array from any IEnumerable (array, list, etc.)
    Array MakeArray(IEnumerable parm, Type t)
    {
        if (parm == null)
            return Array.CreateInstance(t, 0);
        int arrCount;
        if (parm is IList)     // Most arrays etc. implement IList
            arrCount = ((IList)parm).Count;
        else
        {
            arrCount = 0;
            foreach (object nextMember in parm)
            {
                if (nextMember.GetType() == t)
                    ++arrCount;
            }
        }
        Array retval = Array.CreateInstance(t, arrCount);
        int ix = 0;
        foreach (object nextMember in parm)
        {
            if (nextMember.GetType() == t)
                retval.SetValue(nextMember, ix);
            ++ix;
        }
        return retval;
    }
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IEnumerable will not work for me, because I need to assign the array reference to a property via reflection. –  recursive Jun 24 '11 at 16:14
    
You could use the same MyFunc above to return a string array too -- from any kind of object (if it isn't string, call ToString on it). –  Ed Bayiates Jun 24 '11 at 16:18
    
OK, I changed my function to crawl any IEnumerable to make a string array from it. –  Ed Bayiates Jun 24 '11 at 16:20
    
Sorry if I wasn't clear. string was just an example I used to illustrate the problem. I need code that will work for any type. My code may or may not actually be handling strings. I don't know that during compile time. –  recursive Jun 24 '11 at 16:23
    
OK, give me a couple of minutes, I'll make it more generic. –  Ed Bayiates Jun 24 '11 at 16:25
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You'd have to manually go through every object, get the most generic common type between them, and then create a new array of that type and copy the elements. There's no one-liner for this.

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The actual object references are already correct. It's just that they're contained in an object[]. I just need to copy the same references to a new array. –  recursive Jun 24 '11 at 16:12
    
@recursive: If by "correct" you mean that they're the same, then just get the type of the first object and treat it as the most common type. Then create a new array of that type and copy over the objects. –  Mehrdad Jun 24 '11 at 16:14
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This will create the array that you want, but I don't know what you're going to do with it afterwards, since the compiler still doesn't know what the type of the array object is.

Type myType = typeof(string);
object[] myArray = new object[] { "foo", "bar" };

Array myArrayOfTheCorrectType = Array.CreateInstance(myType, myArray.Length);
for (int index = 0; index < myArray.Length; index++)
    myArrayOfTheCorrectType.SetValue(myArray[index], index);
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I would say the answer is it cant be cast. I know alot of other people have offered solutions, but the answer is no. I think the reason is because the type of the array is object, which is lower than string. The compiler will not let the upconversion happen unless you do it manually. I also played around with the DLR stuff, but it still types it as object.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // could actually be anything else
        Type myType = typeof(string);
        Type myArrayType = Array.CreateInstance(myType, 1).GetType();

        // i already know all the elements are the correct types
        object[] myArray = new object[] { "foo", "bar" };

        MethodInfo castMethod = typeof(Program).GetMethod("Cast").MakeGenericMethod(myArrayType);
        object castedObject = castMethod.Invoke(null, new object[] { myArray });
    }

    public static T Cast<T>(object o)
    {
        return (T)o;
    }
}
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