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Has anyone tested this in release mode builds? Or are the implementations so similar there's no significant difference?

I'm interested in the speed to:

  1. Create a new shared_ptr

  2. Create a copy of the shared_ptr

  3. De-reference the pointer to access the pointee

This would be in a release build optimized for speed with new shared_ptrs being created with make_shared()

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7  
Why don't you measure it yourself? I guess there won't be measurable difference. –  ybungalobill Jun 24 '11 at 16:55
2  
std::shared_ptr is usually based on boost::shared_ptr, but I think that the std:: version in theory could be faster because it's allowed to exploit compiler-specific support that boost may not have. But I think that usually they will be equally fast; still, when in doubt measure. –  Matteo Italia Jun 24 '11 at 16:56
2  
Are you performing these operations often enough for it to matter. –  Greg Jun 24 '11 at 17:03
1  
@sven I was hoping that someone had already done this. Hence the question. If not, I'll try it and post the results. –  mpipe3 Jun 24 '11 at 17:11
3  
@Matteo Italia: Boost libraries have quite a bit of compiler knowledge. The fact that they are multiplatform does not mean that they do not exploit each platform in which they are compiled. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 24 '11 at 17:31
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Ok, so it doesn't look like anyone has done this. Here's what I found using the standard VC 10 optimized settings for a WIN32 console app:

  1. Visual C++ 2010 SP1 std::make_shared and std::shared_ptr were faster than the Boost 1.46.1 equivalents when populating a vector of 10 million pointer entries ( 1.96 secs versus 0.92 secs averaged across 20 runs)

  2. Boost 1.46.1 was slightly faster than Visual C++ 2010 SP1 when copying an array of 10 million pointer entries ( 0.15 secs versus 0.17 secs averaged over 20 runs)

  3. Visual C++ 2010 SP1 was slightly faster than the Boost 1.46.1 equivalents when dereferencing a vector of 10 million pointer entries 20 times ( 0.72 secs versus 0.811 secs averaged over 20 runs)

CONCLUSION: There was a significant difference when creating shared_ptrs to populate a vector. The Visual C++ 2010 shared_ptr was nearly twice as fast indicating a substantial difference in implementation compared to Boost 1.46.1.

The other tests didn't show a significant difference.

Here's the code I used:

#include "stdafx.h"

struct A
{
    A( const unsigned A) : m_value(A)
    {
    }

    const unsigned m_value;
};

typedef std::shared_ptr<A> APtr;
typedef boost::shared_ptr<A> ABoostPtr;


double TestSTLCreateSpeed()
{
    const unsigned NUM_ENTRIES = 10000000;
    std::vector<APtr> buffer;
    buffer.reserve(NUM_ENTRIES);

    boost::timer timer;

    for( unsigned nEntry = 0; nEntry < NUM_ENTRIES; ++nEntry)
    {
        buffer.emplace_back( std::make_shared<A>(nEntry) );
    }

    const double timeTaken = timer.elapsed();

    std::cout << "STL create test took " << timeTaken << " secs.\r\n";
    return timeTaken;
}

double BoostSTLCreateSpeed()
{
    const unsigned NUM_ENTRIES = 10000000;
    std::vector<ABoostPtr> buffer;
    buffer.reserve(NUM_ENTRIES);

    boost::timer timer;

    for( unsigned nEntry = 0; nEntry < NUM_ENTRIES; ++nEntry)
    {
        buffer.emplace_back( boost::make_shared<A>(nEntry) );
    }

    const double timeTaken = timer.elapsed();

    std::cout << "BOOST create test took " << timeTaken << " secs.\r\n";
    return timeTaken;
}

double TestSTLCopySpeed()
{
    const unsigned NUM_ENTRIES = 10000000;
    std::vector<APtr> buffer;
    buffer.reserve(NUM_ENTRIES);

    for( unsigned nEntry = 0; nEntry < NUM_ENTRIES; ++nEntry)
    {
        buffer.emplace_back( std::make_shared<A>(nEntry) );
    }

    boost::timer timer;
    std::vector<APtr> buffer2 = buffer;

    const double timeTaken = timer.elapsed();

    std::cout << "STL copy test took " << timeTaken << " secs.\r\n";
    return timeTaken;
}

double TestBoostCopySpeed()
{
    const unsigned NUM_ENTRIES = 10000000;
    std::vector<ABoostPtr> buffer;
    buffer.reserve(NUM_ENTRIES);

    for( unsigned nEntry = 0; nEntry < NUM_ENTRIES; ++nEntry)
    {
        buffer.emplace_back( boost::make_shared<A>(nEntry) );
    }

    boost::timer timer;
    std::vector<ABoostPtr> buffer2 = buffer;

    const double timeTaken = timer.elapsed();

    std::cout << "BOOST copy test took " << timeTaken << " secs.\r\n";
    return timeTaken;
}

double TestBoostDerefSpeed()
{
    const unsigned NUM_ENTRIES = 10000000;
    std::vector<ABoostPtr> buffer;
    buffer.reserve(NUM_ENTRIES);

    for( unsigned nEntry = 0; nEntry < NUM_ENTRIES; ++nEntry)
    {
        buffer.emplace_back( boost::make_shared<A>(nEntry) );
    }

    boost::timer timer;

    unsigned total = 0;

    for(unsigned nIter = 0; nIter < 20; ++nIter)
    {
        std::for_each( buffer.begin(), buffer.end(),
            [&](const ABoostPtr& pA){ 
                total += pA->m_value;
        });
    }

    const double timeTaken = timer.elapsed();

    std::cout << "BOOST deref total =  " << total << ".\r\n";

    std::cout << "BOOST deref test took " << timeTaken << " secs.\r\n";
    return timeTaken;
}

double TestSTLDerefSpeed()
{
    const unsigned NUM_ENTRIES = 10000000;
    std::vector<APtr> buffer;
    buffer.reserve(NUM_ENTRIES);

    for( unsigned nEntry = 0; nEntry < NUM_ENTRIES; ++nEntry)
    {
        buffer.emplace_back( std::make_shared<A>(nEntry) );
    }

    boost::timer timer;

    unsigned total = 0;
    for(unsigned nIter = 0; nIter < 20; ++nIter)
    {
        std::for_each( buffer.begin(), buffer.end(),
            [&](const APtr& pA){ 
                total += pA->m_value;
        });
    }

    const double timeTaken = timer.elapsed();

    std::cout << "STL deref total =  " << total << ".\r\n";

    std::cout << "STL deref test took " << timeTaken << " secs.\r\n";
    return timeTaken;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    double totalTime = 0.0;
    const unsigned NUM_TESTS = 20;

    totalTime = 0.0;

    for ( unsigned nTest = 0; nTest < NUM_TESTS; ++nTest)
    {
        totalTime += BoostSTLCreateSpeed();
    }

    std::cout << "BOOST create test took " << totalTime / NUM_TESTS << " secs average.\r\n";

    totalTime = 0.0;
    for ( unsigned nTest = 0; nTest < NUM_TESTS; ++nTest)
    {
        totalTime += TestSTLCreateSpeed();
    }

    std::cout << "STL create test took " << totalTime / NUM_TESTS << " secs average.\r\n";


    totalTime = 0.0;
    for ( unsigned nTest = 0; nTest < NUM_TESTS; ++nTest)
    {
        totalTime += TestBoostCopySpeed();
    }

    std::cout << "BOOST copy test took " << totalTime / NUM_TESTS << " secs average.\r\n";

    totalTime = 0.0;
    for ( unsigned nTest = 0; nTest < NUM_TESTS; ++nTest)
    {
        totalTime += TestSTLCopySpeed();
    }

    std::cout << "STL copy test took " << totalTime / NUM_TESTS << " secs average.\r\n";

    totalTime = 0.0;
    for ( unsigned nTest = 0; nTest < NUM_TESTS; ++nTest)
    {
        totalTime += TestBoostDerefSpeed();
    }

    std::cout << "Boost deref test took " << totalTime / NUM_TESTS << " secs average.\r\n";

    totalTime = 0.0;
    for ( unsigned nTest = 0; nTest < NUM_TESTS; ++nTest)
    {
        totalTime += TestSTLDerefSpeed();
    }

    std::cout << "STL deref test took " << totalTime / NUM_TESTS << " secs average.\r\n";

    return 0;
}

I'll wait a while and if no one has refuted my results or come up with some better conclusions I'll accept my own answer.

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1  
Thanks for taking the time to report your results. –  hplbsh Jun 27 '11 at 17:32
    
Thanks for this report. Now, you may also want to test the deletion behaviour with a custom deleter, as that is also an important part that is frequently used, especially for shared_ptr<void>. –  Xeo Jun 29 '11 at 21:54
    
Any idea what in the VS implementation makes it faster? I'm pretty familiar with the boost implementation and there isn't any obvious way it could be improved off the top of my head. Maybe it makes nonportable assumptions based on knowing MS's allocator is in use? –  Joseph Garvin Dec 14 '12 at 15:45
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VS10's version uses rvalue references and move semantics when possible, so in principle it has the upper hand over the Boost C++98 implementation. You'd probably have to work fairly hard to create a program that would show a significant practical difference, though... but do give it a try. Also don't forget about std::make_shared, which is new in C++0x thanks to forwarding.

Update: Dereferencing and copying are going to be practically identical in any case. Perhaps there are some interesting differences in the way custom deleters and allocators are stored, and in how make_shared is implemented. Let me check the source.

Update 2: Funnily enough, the Boost version that uses variadic templates and rvalue references definitely looks better than the VS10 version, since VS10 doesn't have variadic templates and has to employ horrible black arts to fake that behaviour. But that's entirely a compile-time issue so it's not relevant.

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3  
Boost isn't limited to C++98. It is uses C++0x features like rvalues where available. So on VC 10 it does use perfect forwarding and move semantics, etc. See boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/smart_ptr/make_shared.html –  mpipe3 Jun 24 '11 at 17:04
    
@mpipe3: Alright - the C++0x implementation of Boost is probably very similar to the VS10 one in that case. Do you know if Boost's make_shared has the same efficient implementation as VS10's? –  Kerrek SB Jun 24 '11 at 17:08
    
I am confused. Do you say the VS version might be faster or the boost one? :-) –  liori Jun 24 '11 at 17:14
    
@liori: I wasn't sure how well Boost takes advantage of new C++0x features. It looks like it does, so the two are going to be virtually identical. If you force Boost to conform to C++98, then VS10 should have a slight advantage. –  Kerrek SB Jun 24 '11 at 17:20
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