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package Test;

public class A {

    public A() {
        System.out.println("Enter construct A...");
        init();
    }

    public void init() {
        System.out.println("Enter A's init...");
    }

}

package Test;

public class B extends A {

    int i = 0; 
    int j;

    public void init() {
        System.out.println("Enter B's init...");
        i = 100;
        j = 100;
    }

    public void printAll(){
        System.out.println(i);
        System.out.println(j);
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        B b = new B();
        b.printAll();
    }

}
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closed as not a real question by Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen, Dan, Jesper, Robin, Bill the Lizard Jun 24 '11 at 18:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Is that something you have to do in class? –  Akku Jun 24 '11 at 17:19
4  
This site is not a classroom. Do you have any question or you don't understand something about this code ? –  PeterMmm Jun 24 '11 at 17:21
    
hey , this is not the paper examination , why cannot run the code? –  Ken Chan Jun 24 '11 at 17:24
    
please see the stackoverflow.com/faq#dontask about what kind of questions are appropriate for Stack Overflow. –  Dan Jun 24 '11 at 18:08
    
I'm sorry for that. –  SuoNayi Jun 27 '11 at 13:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, new B gets first an A get created, first instance fields, then calling B's init() which sets i and j to 100. Then the B gets created, which initializes the i to 0.

Enter construct A...
Enter B's init...
0
100
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Guess it's because the constructor is run before the non-static fields are initialized. –  Akku Jun 24 '11 at 17:24
    
why does it print 100 for i instead of 0? By the time printall is called the constructor should've finished –  jhlu87 Jun 24 '11 at 17:44
    
Edited the answer. Happy coding! –  Akku Jun 24 '11 at 17:57
    
Great answer,It's very interesting to see the strange behavior of JVM. –  SuoNayi Jun 27 '11 at 14:01

I suppose:

Enter construct A...
Enter B's init...
100
100

Because the A constructor has to be called bevore B can be constructed and as the class you're instatiating is from type B, the init of B is called (there is no super.init() call so the init method of class B hides the one from the super class)

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Akku is right if you run the code by yourself. –  SuoNayi Jun 27 '11 at 14:02

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