Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to read a string, character by character, and build a new string as the output.

What's the best approach to do this in C#?

Use a StringBuilder? Use some writer/stream?

Note that there will be no I/O operations--this is strictly an in-memory transformation.

share|improve this question
3  
What are you actually trying to achieve, an example would be helpful –  ChrisBint Jun 24 '11 at 18:15
    
Do you know the size of or your reformatted string in advance? If so, you should be able to create a char[] if the reformatted string size, put each char into it, then convert it back to a string with new String(charBuffer). –  Juliet Jun 24 '11 at 18:21
add comment

6 Answers 6

If the size of the string cannot be determined at compile time and it may also be relatively large, you should use a StringBuilder for concatenation as it acts like a mutable string.

var input = SomeLongString;

// may as well initialize the capacity as well
// as the length will be 1 to 1 with the unprocessed input.
var sb = new StringBuilder( input.Length );
foreach( char c in input )
{
    sb.Append( Process( c ) );
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

if it's just one string you can use a collection to hold your characters and then just create the string using the constructor:

IEnumerable<char> myChars = ...;
string result = new string(myChars);

Using Linq and with the help of a method ProcessChar(char c) that transforms each character to its output value this could be just a query transformation (using the string constructor that takes an IEnumerable<char> as input):

string result = new string(sourceString.Select(c => ProcessChar(c)));

This is as efficient as using a StringBuilder (since StringBuilder is used internally in the string class to construct the string from the IEnumerable), but much more readable in my opinion.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Stringbuilder is usually a pretty good bet. I've written lots of javascript in webpages using it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

A StringBuilder is good idea for building your new string, because you can efficiently append new values to it. As for reading the characters from the input string, a StringReader would be a sufficient choice.

share|improve this answer
add comment
void Main()
{
    string myLongString = "lf;kajsd;lfkjal;dfkja;lkdfja;lkdjf;alkjdfa";

    var transformedTString = string.Join(string.Empty, myLongString.ToCharArray().Where(x => x != ';'));

    transformedTString.Dump();
}

If you have more complicated logic you can move your validation to separate predicated method

void Main()
{
    string myLongString = "lf;kajsd;lfkjal;dfkja;lkdfja;lkdjf;alkjdfa";

    var transformedTString = string.Join(string.Empty, myLongString.ToCharArray().Where(MyPredicate));

    transformedTString.Dump();
}

public bool MyPredicate(char c)
{
    return c != ';';
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

What's the difference between read string and output string? I mean why do you have to read char by char?

I use this method for reading string

string str = "some stuff";
string newStr = ToNewString(str);


string ToNewString(string arg)
{
   string r = string.Empty;
   foreach (char c in arg)
      r += DoWork(c);
   return r;
}

char DoWorK(char arg)
{
    // What do you want to do here?
}
share|improve this answer
    
And that would be about the worst way to do it. You could potentially create a ton of copies in your loop and the OP mentions specifically that the string will be large. –  Ed S. Jun 24 '11 at 23:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.