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I'm wondering if anyone can do this. Say I have this folder structure:

Folder A
    Folder Apple
    Folder Orange

If I am currently in Folder A, I'd like it so that if I type "cd Ap" and hit enter, it'll automatically put me in the "Apple" subfolder. Essentially, it would attempt to autocomplete and open the folder based off the partial input.

If I am currently in Folder A, and I type "cd ap" and hit enter (lowercase "a"), I would get an error because it couldn't autocomplete to an actual subfolder name. Is this possible? I'm working in Korn.

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Seems like it would have many unintended consequences. What's wrong with hitting TAB to complete? Does Korn not support tab completion? –  Cfreak Jun 24 '11 at 19:13
    
What do you want to do if there's also an "Apricot" directory? –  glenn jackman Jun 24 '11 at 20:21
    
@Cfreak good question; it's really just a small convenience thing. I can definitely do without, but it's just slower to have to hit ESC ESC or any other key every time I want to autocomplete a directory and enter it. It would basically function just like if I tried to autocomplete it manually and cd into it manually, except it's automated. I understand if this is more work than its worth. :P –  carlinyuen Jun 28 '11 at 19:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not quite going to answer your question, but I'll get close. It seems to me like hitting the tab key isn't the hurdle for you, it's the capitalization. I know the feeling, it's like choosing between camelCase and inconvenient typing.

I've only done this in bash, my apoligies. If I recall, bash and ksh are rather close, so I'm hoping it will work for you.

set completion-ignore-case on turns on case-insensitive completion in bash. Naturally this goes into any startup scripts you may want it in.

Good luck, tell us if it works in ksh !

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Ah unfortunately it doesn't seem to be working, but thanks for the reply anyway! I might consider switching to bash; I hear it's better anyway. :P –  carlinyuen Jun 28 '11 at 19:17
    
@Carlin : Sorry to hear it doesn't work in ksh. It's one of the first things I do when settling into a system. –  Vasiliy Sharapov Jun 29 '11 at 2:27

Here's a ksh function (untested)

cd () {
  typeset prefix=$1
  typeset destination=""
  for f in *; do
    [[ -d "$f" ]] || continue
    case "$f" in 
      "$prefix"*) destination="$f"; break ;;
    esac
  done
  if [[ -z "$destination" ]]; then
    print -u2 "error: can't find directory with prefix '$prefix'"
  else
    command cd "$destination"
  fi
}

With ksh, Esc\ is the equivalent of bash tab-completion.

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1  
Thanks glenn; unfortunately it gives me a "restricted: cd is a shell builtin" though. I appreciate the code! –  carlinyuen Jun 28 '11 at 19:15

For Bash, you can add the following to your ~/.bashrc. By default, it will do case-insensitive matching. It's a bit long, but it should handle anything you throw at it (except for trying to autocomplete cd ../my_direc from a symlink directory (see here for more info on that).

If you use this script and leave it as case-insensitve, you might as well also add bind 'set completion-ignore-case on' to your ~/.bashrc so that TAB-completion is also case-insensitive.

cd() {
    # Attempts to autocomplete the directory name
    #
    # If it fails to find a match, it'll still execute the input, in case the argument was
    # something like "-".
    case_insens=1 # set to one if you want it to try case-insensitive matching

    # for exact matches, cd immediately
    if [ -d "$1" ]; then
        builtin cd "$1"
        return
    fi
    # deal with no arguments passed
    if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then
        builtin cd
        return
    fi

    # first loop for case-sensitive (since we prefer a case-sensitive match)
    # for more on this globbing, see: bit.ly/1CZ9qym
    for element in "$(dirname "$1")"/{*,.[!.]*,..?*}; do
        # skip if this result is not a directory
        [ -d "$element" ] || continue

        if [[ "$(basename "$element")" == "$(basename "$1")"* ]]; then
            # if there's no ambiguity, switch to that folder
            if [ $(find -L "$(dirname "$1")" -maxdepth 1 -name "$(basename "$1")*" -type d 2>/dev/null | wc -l) -gt 1 ]; then
                echo "'$1' matches multiple results:  "
                echo "$(find -L "$(dirname "$1")" -maxdepth 1 -name "$(basename "$1")*" -type d 2>/dev/null)" 
                # try to cd anyway
                builtin cd "$1" &> /dev/null 
                unset case_insens element
                return
            else
                builtin cd "$element"
                unset case_insens element
                return              
            fi
        fi
    done

    if [ $case_insens -eq 1 ]; then
        #case-insensitive argument
        ci_arg="${1,,}"
    else
        builtin cd "$1"
        unset case_insens element
        return
    fi

    #Case-insensitive loop
    for element in "$(dirname "$1")"/{*,.[!.]*,..?*}; do
        # skip if this result is not a directory
        [ -d "$element" ] || continue   

        ci_element_name="$(basename "${element,,}")"
        if [[ "$ci_element_name" == "$(basename "$ci_arg")"* ]]; then
            # if there's no ambiguity, switch to that folder
            if [ $(find -L "$(dirname "$element")" -maxdepth 1 -iname "${ci_element_name}*" -type d 2>/dev/null | wc -l) -gt 1 ]; then
                echo "'$ci_arg' matches multiple results:  "
                echo "$(find -L "$(dirname "$element")" -maxdepth 1 -iname "${ci_element_name}*" -type d 2>/dev/null)"
                # try to cd anyway
                builtin cd "$1" &> /dev/null
                unset ci_arg case_insens ci_element element
                return
            else
                builtin cd "$element"
                unset ci_arg case_insens ci_element element
                return
            fi
        fi
    done
    # we still haven't found a match, so pass the (faulty) argument to the cd command
    builtin cd "$1"
    unset ci_arg case_insens ci_element element
}

Example Usage

cd ~
cd deskt
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I know the OP asked about ksh, but I'm posting this for any Bash users who come across this question. –  Garrett Oct 6 '14 at 8:48

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