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I have an interesting issue where a class inherits from a class that implements IEnumerable, but I also want the class to implement IEnumerable for a different type. Everything works except for IEnumerable extension methods, which means I can't do any LINQ to objects by default without always having to cast first. Does anyone have any ideas besides constantly casting?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace LinqTesting
{
    public class Trucks<T> : Vehicles, IEnumerable<Truck>
    {    
        public Trucks()
        {    
            // Does Compile
            var a = ((IEnumerable<Truck>)this).FirstOrDefault();
            // Doesn't Compile, Linq.FirstOrDefault not found
            var b = this.FirstOrDefault();
        }    

        public new IEnumerator<Truck> GetEnumerator() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }    

    public class Vehicles : IEnumerable<Vehicle>
    {    
        public IEnumerator<Vehicle> GetEnumerator() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
        System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }    

    public class Vehicle { }

    public class Truck : Vehicle { }
}     
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2  
Isn't your Truck object inheriting two IEnumerable types? How do you expect the compiler to find out which enumerable type you want to use, try upcasting to the one you want and then select FirstOrDefault –  Yet Another Geek Jun 24 '11 at 19:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Actually you can, but you can't take the advantage of generic types inference, because your class implements two IEnumerable<T> of two different types and the compiler can't know which type you want to use.

You can specify it direclty, like:

var b = this.FirstOrDefault<Truck>();
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This is really what I was missing. It was confusing because the intellisense would popup showing the method, but it would also show the error in the same line because the compiler could no longer take advantage of generic type inference. –  Daryl Jun 24 '11 at 20:05

Change your code to:

public class Trucks : Vehicles<Truck>
{    
}    

public class Vehicles<T> : IEnumerable<T>
    where T : Vehicle
{    
}    

public class Vehicle { }

public class Truck : Vehicle { }
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just a few mins to slow ;) –  Clayton Jun 24 '11 at 19:24
    
@Clayton - that's life ;-) –  Jakub Konecki Jun 24 '11 at 19:43
    
unfortunately I don't have access to base class code, but that would be the right solution. I'll have to see if I can get that change made. Thanks! –  Daryl Jun 24 '11 at 20:03

Implementing IEnumerable multiple time confuses compiler, which IEnumerable<> it should consider for this.

IEnumerable<Vehicle> or IEnumerable<Truck>?

this.FirstOrDefault<Truck>() might compile. 
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public new IEnumerator GetEnumerator()

That new keyword in that line hides the GetEnumerator() method inherited from the Vehicle class. I'm not sure this will work, but perhaps try explicit interface implementation instead.

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Looks like you're kinda stuck. Here's a suggestion to reduce your typing. You can create an extension method for some of your commonly used IEnumerable<> types.

var a = myList.AsTruckEnumerable().FirstOrDefault();

public static partial class Extensions
{
  public static IEnumerable<Truck> AsTruckEnumerable (this IEnumerable<Truck> trucks)
  {
     return trucks;
  }
}

public class Trucks<T> : Vehicles, IEnumerable<Truck>
{    
   public Trucks()
   {    
      // Does Compile
      var a = ((IEnumerable<Truck>)this).FirstOrDefault();

      // Does compile
      var b = this.AsTruckEnumerable().FirstOrDefault();
      // Doesn't Compile, Linq.FirstOrDefault not found
      //var b = this.FirstOrDefault();
   }    

   public new IEnumerator<Truck> GetEnumerator() { throw new NotImplementedException(); } 
}    
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