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Let's say I have a MySQL table with four columns:

ID DRIVER_ID CAR_ID NOTES (NULL for most rows)

I have a bunch of duplicate rows where DRIVER_ID and CAR_ID are the same. For each pair of DRIVER_ID and CAR_ID, I want one row. If one of the rows in the set has non-NULL NOTES, I want that one, but otherwise it doesn't matter.

so if I have:

ID  |  DRIVER_ID  |  CAR_ID  |  NOTES
1      1             1          NULL
2      1             1          NULL
3      1             2          NULL
4      1             2          NULL
5      2             3          NULL
6      2             3          NULL
7      2             3          NULL
8      2             3          hi
9      3             5          NULL

I want to keep the following IDs: 9, 8, and then one each of [3,4] and [1,2].

It's a huge table, and the clunky methods I've tried are insanely slow, to the point where I'm sure I'm going about it all wrong. How can I efficiently a) select the list of IDs to delete? b) delete them in the same query?

(And yes, I know the deal with composite keys. That's not an issue here.)

EDIT: Sorry, forgot to specify that this was MySQL.

Some of the stuff I've tried so far:

select ID, COUNT(DRIVER_ID) rowcount from CARS_DRIVERS group by CAR_ID,DRIVER_ID HAVING rowcount > 1;

will get me one ID per group. It doesn't necessarily leave the row with NOTES if there is one, though. It will also only get me one ID per duplicate group. There are some cases where there are 20+ duplicate combos, so I would need to iterate that over and over to whittle each group down to a single row.

select distinct t1.ID from CARS_DRIVERS t1 where exists (select * from CARS_DRIVERS t2 where t2.CAR_ID = t1.CAR_ID and t2.DRIVER_ID = t1.DRIVER_ID and t2.id > t1.id);

This is much slower, and still doesn't really address the NOTES issue. It does have the advantage of getting the oldest row for each group, which, if I can't isolate on the NOTES field easily, could be a proxy for that. If a row in a set has NOTES, I believe it's always the oldest one (one with the lowest ID), but I'm not certain.

Some additional context: DRIVER_ID and CAR_ID are not the real column names, and there are other columns in the table. I was trying to distill down the info to get at the root of the problem, but I see from W4M's comment that this makes it look like a homework assignment. The real deal is that I'm looking at a very unoptimized database (not my purview normally) and when trying to get rid of these dupes before adding a key, the operation is taking forever. As in, hours. The table is big but certainly doesn't justify that. I'm trying to pitch in with my limited SQL expertise and figure out a way to get this done. Doesn't matter if it's pretty, I can sit at the command line and brute-force a bunch of queries if necessary. But I noticed that SELECTing IDs that are candidates for deletion only takes a few seconds, and although the table is huge, the total number of rows to delete is less than 10k so there must be a way to make this happen without some script that takes a whole weekend to finish.

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what have you written so far. –  Woot4Moo Jun 24 '11 at 19:16
    
What is your RDBMS? –  Vache Jun 24 '11 at 19:16
    
@Vache he is using MySQL –  Woot4Moo Jun 24 '11 at 19:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's one solution. I tested this on MySQL 5.5.8.

SELECT MAX(COALESCE(c2.id, c1.id)) AS id,
 c1.driver_id, c1.car_id,
 c2.notes AS notes
FROM cars_drivers AS c1
LEFT OUTER JOIN cars_drivers AS c2
 ON (c1.driver_id,c1.car_id) = (c2.driver_id,c2.car_id) AND c2.notes IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY c1.driver_id, c1.car_id, c2.notes;

I include c2.notes as a GROUP BY key because you might have more than one row with non-null notes per values of driver_id,car_id.

Result using your example data:

+------+-----------+--------+-------+
| id   | driver_id | car_id | notes |
+------+-----------+--------+-------+
|    2 |         1 |      1 | NULL  |
|    4 |         2 |      1 | NULL  |
|    8 |         3 |      2 | hi    |
|    9 |         5 |      3 | NULL  |
+------+-----------+--------+-------+

Regarding deleting. In your example data, it's always the highest id value per driver_id & car_id that you want to keep. If you can depend on that, you can do a multi-table delete that deletes all rows for which a row with a higher id value and the same driver_id & car_id exists:

DELETE c1 FROM cars_drivers AS c1 INNER JOIN cars_drivers AS c2
 ON (c1.driver_id,c1.car_id) = (c2.driver_id,c2.car_id) AND c1.id < c2.id;

This naturally skips any cases where only one row exists with a given pair of driver_id & car_id values, because the conditions of the inner join require two rows with different id values.

But if you can't depend on the latest id per group being the one you want to keep, the solution is more complex. It's probably more complex than it's worth to solve in one statement, so do it in two statements.

I tested this too, after adding a couple more rows for testing:

INSERT INTO cars_drivers VALUES (10,2,3,NULL), (11,2,3,'bye');

+----+--------+-----------+-------+
| id | car_id | driver_id | notes |
+----+--------+-----------+-------+
|  1 |      1 |         1 | NULL  |
|  2 |      1 |         1 | NULL  |
|  3 |      1 |         2 | NULL  |
|  4 |      1 |         2 | NULL  |
|  5 |      2 |         3 | NULL  |
|  6 |      2 |         3 | NULL  |
|  7 |      2 |         3 | NULL  |
|  8 |      2 |         3 | hi    |
|  9 |      3 |         5 | NULL  |
| 10 |      2 |         3 | NULL  |
| 11 |      2 |         3 | bye   |
+----+--------+-----------+-------+

First delete rows with null notes, where a row with non-null notes exists.

DELETE c1 FROM cars_drivers AS c1 INNER JOIN cars_drivers AS c2
 ON (c1.driver_id,c1.car_id) = (c2.driver_id,c2.car_id)
WHERE c1.notes IS NULL AND c2.notes IS NOT NULL;

+----+--------+-----------+-------+
| id | car_id | driver_id | notes |
+----+--------+-----------+-------+
|  1 |      1 |         1 | NULL  |
|  2 |      1 |         1 | NULL  |
|  3 |      1 |         2 | NULL  |
|  4 |      1 |         2 | NULL  |
|  8 |      2 |         3 | hi    |
|  9 |      3 |         5 | NULL  |
| 11 |      2 |         3 | bye   |
+----+--------+-----------+-------+

Second, delete all but the highest-id row from each group of duplicates.

DELETE c1 FROM cars_drivers AS c1 INNER JOIN cars_drivers AS c2
 ON (c1.driver_id,c1.car_id) = (c2.driver_id,c2.car_id) AND c1.id < c2.id;

+----+--------+-----------+-------+
| id | car_id | driver_id | notes |
+----+--------+-----------+-------+
|  2 |      1 |         1 | NULL  |
|  4 |      1 |         2 | NULL  |
|  9 |      3 |         5 | NULL  |
| 11 |      2 |         3 | bye   |
+----+--------+-----------+-------+
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Still testing this out but it seems to work! Thank you! –  NChase Jun 24 '11 at 21:14

Since this is very similar to homework I will not give the answer. You want to do a left join and/or issue a distinct query.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/distinct-optimization.html

EDIT Completely untested:

select distinct(t1.car_id) from cars_drivers t1 where t1.car_id = t1.driver_id and notes != null;

handles the call where you want notes. In the event that list is zero you want to run this:

select distinct(t1.car_id) from cars_drivers t1 where t1.car_id = t1.driver_id;
share|improve this answer
1  
Uh, what? I provided a very simplified, generic presentation of my problem because I can't publicly give out the schema of my employer's database tables. What a ridiculous response. –  NChase Jun 24 '11 at 19:19
    
not really a ridiculous response. You must be new on SO, typically when someone 1) doesn't post the code they have written so far and 2) provides a trivial sample of data it is often considered homework. –  Woot4Moo Jun 24 '11 at 19:21
    
My apologies, I see your point. As you can see from my SO history, I'm not that well-versed in the norms, aaaand most of my questions involve me being flummoxed trying to pick the right SQL query. ;) –  NChase Jun 24 '11 at 19:35
    
Trying to work through it just being one database hit –  Woot4Moo Jun 24 '11 at 19:51
    
Thanks - I added some additional context above. If I can get an effective method of grabbing all the IDs to delete, I can just run through some DELETE FROM ... WHERE ID IN (1,2,3...) queries to actually remove them. –  NChase Jun 24 '11 at 19:56

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