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I have came across this very interesting program of printing numbers in pyramid.

If n = 1 then print the following,

1  2
4  3

if n = 2 then print the following,

1  2  3
8  9  4
7  6  5

if n = 3 then print the following,

1   2   3   4
12  13  14  5
11  16  15  6
10   9   8  7

I can print all these using taking quite a few loops and variables but it looks very specific. You might have noticed that all these pyramid filling starts in one direction until it find path filled. As you might have noticed 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 filed in outer edges till it finds 1 so after it goes in second row after 12 and prints 13,14 and so on. It prints in spiral mode something like snakes game snakes keep on going until it hits itself.

I would like to know is there any algorithms behind this pyramid generation or its just tricky time consuming pyramid generation program.

Thanks in advance. This is a very interesting challenging program so I kindly request no need of pipeline of down vote :)

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2  
I would say spiral rather than pyramid. –  tibur Jun 24 '11 at 19:45
    
I agree logically its spiral but physically its pyramid –  user449355 Jun 24 '11 at 19:46
    
This pattern is called a Spiral Matrix (see the link for solutions in 41 languages). –  DarkDust Jun 25 '11 at 8:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I made a small recursive algorithm for your problem.

public int Determine(int n, int x, int y)
{
  if (y == 0) return x + 1;         // Top
  if (x == n) return n + y + 1;     // Right
  if (y == n) return 3 * n - x + 1; // Bottom
  if (x == 0) return 4 * n - y + 1; // Left
  return 4 * n + Determine(n - 2, x - 1, y - 1);
}

You can call it by using a double for loop. x and y start at 0:

for (int y=0; y<=n; y++) 
  for (int x=0; x<=n; x++) 
    result[x,y] = Determine(n,x,y);
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@C.Zonnerberg -- I found this interesting and just for fun I decided to try it out in C. I had to make a few changes to the above algorithm to get the desired output. I swapped x's and y's in most places and changed several of n's to n-1. (I'll post the C code and its output as an answer) –  dave Jun 24 '11 at 21:38
    
Yup, definitely a classic off-by-one: you need to your n's into n-1 since the counting starts at 0. Apart from that, +1. –  DarkDust Jun 25 '11 at 8:40
    
I wish I could award another +1 for this solution, since I find it way more elegant than most of the solutions at Rosetta Code. –  DarkDust Jun 25 '11 at 8:49

Here is some C code implementing the basic algorithm submitted by @C.Zonnerberg my example uses n=6 for a 6x6 array.

I had to make a few changes to get the output the way I expected it to look. I swapped most the the x's and y's and changed several of the n's to n-1 and changed the comparisons in the for loops from <= to <

int main(){
  int x,y,n;
  int result[6][6];
  n=6;
  for (x=0; x<n; x++){
    for (y=0; y<n; y++) {
      result[x][y] = Determine(n,x,y);
      if(y==0)
        printf("\n[%d,%d] = %2d, ", x,y, result[x][y]);
      else
        printf("[%d,%d] = %2d, ", x,y, result[x][y]);
    }
  }
return 0;
}

int Determine(int n, int x, int y)
{
  if (x == 0) return y + 1;         // Top
  if (y == n-1) return n + x;     // Right
  if (x == n-1) return 3 * (n-1) - y + 1; // Bottom
  if (y == 0) return 4 * (n-1) - x + 1; // Left
  return 4 * (n-1) + Determine(n - 2, x - 1, y- 1);
}

Output

[0,0] =  1, [0,1] =  2, [0,2] =  3, [0,3] =  4, [0,4] =  5, [0,5] =  6,
[1,0] = 20, [1,1] = 21, [1,2] = 22, [1,3] = 23, [1,4] = 24, [1,5] =  7,
[2,0] = 19, [2,1] = 32, [2,2] = 33, [2,3] = 34, [2,4] = 25, [2,5] =  8,
[3,0] = 18, [3,1] = 31, [3,2] = 36, [3,3] = 35, [3,4] = 26, [3,5] =  9,
[4,0] = 17, [4,1] = 30, [4,2] = 29, [4,3] = 28, [4,4] = 27, [4,5] = 10,
[5,0] = 16, [5,1] = 15, [5,2] = 14, [5,3] = 13, [5,4] = 12, [5,5] = 11,
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With an all-zeros array, you could start with [row,col] = [0,0], fill in this space, then add [0,1] to position (one to the right) until it's at the end or runs into a non-zero.

Then go down (add [1,0]), filling in space until it's the end or runs into a non-zero.

Then go left (add [0,-1]), filling in space until it's the end or runs into a non-zero.

Then go up (add [-1,0]), filling in space until it's the end or runs into a non-zero.

and repeat...

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