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It is possible to write a function, which, when compiled with a C compiler will return 0, and when compiled with a C++ compiler, will return 1 (the trivial sulution with #ifdef __cplusplus is not interesting).

For example:

int isCPP()
{
    return sizeof(char) == sizeof 'c';
}

Of course, the above will work only if sizeof (char) isn't the same as sizeof (int)

Another, more portable solution is something like this:

int isCPP()
{
    typedef int T;
    {
       struct T 
       {
           int a[2];
       };
       return sizeof(T) == sizeof(struct T);
    }
}

I am not sure if the examples are 100% correct, but you get the idea. I believe there are other ways to write the same function too.

What differences, if any, between C++03 and C++0x can be detected at run-time? In other words, is it possible to write a similar function which would return a boolean value indicating whether it is compiled by a conforming C++03 compiler or a C++0x compiler?

bool isCpp0x()
{ 
    //???
} 
share|improve this question
9  
And what's the point of this exercise? Firstly, you do have a macro, and secondly it will take a number of years before compilers start implementing all features of C++0x, in the meanwhile it will be a mix. So the only reasonable test is the compiler a version macro. –  Gene Bushuyev Jun 25 '11 at 2:34
2  
This fits the bill of not a real question but it seems too interesting to follow the rules! –  David Heffernan Jun 25 '11 at 7:23
2  
"We expect answers to generally involve facts, references, or specific expertise". I think this question meets these expectations, vote for reopen. –  Karel Petranek Jun 26 '11 at 10:59
2  
@six if you look around, many valid questions on SO challenge "folks to write a block of code". Still that doesn't make it codegolf and doesn't make it offtopic. You have it wrong. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 26 '11 at 17:13
5  
@sixlettervariables: while it's certainly open to argument that the phrasing could be better, it seems to me that the fundamental notion of the question (what differences, if any, between C++03 and C++0x can be detected at run-time?) is perfectly legitimate. Given that the code has to compile and execute in both, it could also be phrased as being about the breaking changes in C++0x. That seems to me like a perfectly legitimate question to ask as well. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 26 '11 at 19:17
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8 Answers

up vote 91 down vote accepted

Core Language

Accessing an enumerator using :::

template<int> struct int_ { };

template<typename T> bool isCpp0xImpl(int_<T::X>*) { return true; }
template<typename T> bool isCpp0xImpl(...) { return false; }

enum A { X };
bool isCpp0x() {
  return isCpp0xImpl<A>(0);
}

You can also abuse the new keywords

struct a { };
struct b { a a1, a2; };

struct c : a {
  static b constexpr (a());
};

bool isCpp0x() {
  return (sizeof c::a()) == sizeof(b);
}

Also, the fact that string literals do not anymore convert to char*

bool isCpp0xImpl(...) { return true; }
bool isCpp0xImpl(char*) { return false; }

bool isCpp0x() { return isCpp0xImpl(""); }

I don't know how likely you are to have this working on a real implementation though. One that exploits auto

struct x { x(int z = 0):z(z) { } int z; } y(1);

bool isCpp0x() {
  auto x(y);
  return (y.z == 1);
}

The following is based on the fact that operator int&& is a conversion function to int&& in C++0x, and a conversion to int followed by logical-and in C++03

struct Y { bool x1, x2; };

struct A {
  operator int();
  template<typename T> operator T();
  bool operator+();
} a;

Y operator+(bool, A);

bool isCpp0x() {
  return sizeof(&A::operator int&& +a) == sizeof(Y);
}

That test-case doesn't work for C++0x in GCC (looks like a bug) and doesn't work in C++03 mode for clang. A clang PR has been filed.

The modified treatment of injected class names of templates in C++11:

template<typename T>
bool g(long) { return false; }

template<template<typename> class>
bool g(int) { return true; }

template<typename T>
struct A {
  static bool doIt() {
    return g<A>(0);
  }
};

bool isCpp0x() {
  return A<void>::doIt();
}

A couple of "detect whether this is C++03 or C++0x" can be used to demonstrate breaking changes. The following is a tweaked testcase, which initially was used to demonstrate such a change, but now is used to test for C++0x or C++03.

struct X { };
struct Y { X x1, x2; };

struct A { static X B(int); };
typedef A B;

struct C : A {
  using ::B::B; // (inheriting constructor in c++0x)
  static Y B(...);
};

bool isCpp0x() { return (sizeof C::B(0)) == sizeof(Y); }

Standard Library

Detecting the lack of operator void* in C++0x' std::basic_ios

struct E { E(std::ostream &) { } };

template<typename T>
bool isCpp0xImpl(E, T) { return true; }
bool isCpp0xImpl(void*, int) { return false; }

bool isCpp0x() {
  return isCpp0xImpl(std::cout, 0);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice. I can confirm that this solution works here with g++ (GCC) 4.6.0, both with and without -std=c++0x. –  Alexander Jun 24 '11 at 20:17
2  
This returns true for MSVC 2005 onwards, and a compile error in MSVC 2003. –  Anthony Williams Jun 24 '11 at 20:20
9  
@Johannes : This is the most fun you've had in weeks, isn't it? ;-] –  ildjarn Jun 24 '11 at 23:09
3  
I find these very all interesting, but I think the most clever is the (...) vs (char*) calls. I really like that! –  corsiKa Jun 26 '11 at 0:23
4  
Holy moly...! :-) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 18 '11 at 13:49
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I got an inspiration from What breaking changes are introduced in C++11?:

#define u8 "abc"

bool isCpp0x() {
   const std::string s = u8"def"; // Previously "abcdef", now "def"
   return s == "def";
}

This is based on the new string literals that take precedence over macro expansion.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Very interesting, indeed, but technically breaks the requirement of not using the preprocessor. But the restriction was not intended to dismiss such nice answers :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 24 '11 at 20:52
    
Yeah, the preprocessor is a bit hacky considering the question. But I couldn't resist :) –  Karel Petranek Jun 24 '11 at 21:00
1  
Well, if you follow the function with a #undef u8 then the preprocessor usage is only observable if your program has a previously-defined macro named u8 (boooo). If that is a real concern, that can still be worked around using implementation-specific push/pop macro pragmas/calls (most implementations have these, I believe). –  James McNellis Jun 24 '11 at 22:33
3  
One fairly reasonable argument is that on a C++03 system someone might #define u8 to provide simulated C++0x capabilities. Still, I really like the answer. –  Christopher Smith Jun 26 '11 at 10:55
1  
you can just move this isCpp0x function to a separate translation unit so this macro thing won't affect other code. –  unkulunkulu Jul 25 '11 at 14:23
show 1 more comment

How about a check using the new rules for >> closing templates:

#include <iostream>

const unsigned reallyIsCpp0x=1;
const unsigned isNotCpp0x=0;

template<unsigned>
struct isCpp0xImpl2
{
    typedef unsigned isNotCpp0x;
};

template<typename>
struct isCpp0xImpl
{
    static unsigned const reallyIsCpp0x=0x8000;
    static unsigned const isNotCpp0x=0;
};

bool isCpp0x() {
    unsigned const dummy=0x8000;
    return isCpp0xImpl<isCpp0xImpl2<dummy>>::reallyIsCpp0x > ::isNotCpp0x>::isNotCpp0x;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout<<isCpp0x()<<std::endl;
}

Alternatively a quick check for std::move:

struct any
{
    template<typename T>
    any(T const&)
    {}
};

int move(any)
{
    return 42;
}

bool is_int(int const&)
{
    return true;
}

bool is_int(any)
{
    return false;
}


bool isCpp0x() {
    std::vector<int> v;
    return !is_int(move(v));
}
share|improve this answer
6  
+1 A cool idea indeed :) However, in practice this will break with Visual C++ 2005/2088 which do not support C++0x but allow >> to be used in templates the C++0x way. –  Karel Petranek Jun 24 '11 at 21:02
    
This is just sick :-S –  Kerrek SB Jun 24 '11 at 21:14
    
nice idea! /* filler */ –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 24 '11 at 21:14
1  
@dark_charlie: D'oh! –  Anthony Williams Jun 24 '11 at 21:30
3  
Oooh; I like the ADL abuse! However, couldn't a conforming C++03 implementation have a function named std::move? –  James McNellis Jun 24 '11 at 22:33
show 2 more comments

Unlike prior C++, C++0x allows reference types to be created from reference types if that base reference type is introduced through, for example, a template parameter:

template <class T> bool func(T&) {return true; } 
template <class T> bool func(...){return false;} 

bool isCpp0x() 
{
    int v = 1;
    return func<int&>(v); 
}

Perfect forwarding comes at the price of breaking backwards compatibility, unfortunately.

Another test could be based on now-allowed local types as template arguments:

template <class T> bool cpp0X(T)  {return true;} //cannot be called with local types in C++03
                   bool cpp0X(...){return false;}

bool isCpp0x() 
{
   struct local {} var;
   return cpp0x(var);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Very nice idea! –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 24 '11 at 21:41
    
Perhaps I should have turned that into a trait class ;) –  uwedolinsky Jun 24 '11 at 21:43
1  
+1 Nice idea, I'm only not sure if isC++0x is a valid C++ identifier ;) –  Karel Petranek Jun 24 '11 at 21:50
    
@dark_charlie: Oops, my bad –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 24 '11 at 22:05
1  
What's a good reference for the reference from references inference? –  Kerrek SB Jun 24 '11 at 23:07
show 1 more comment

This isn't quite a correct example, but it's an interesting example that can distinguish C vs. C++0x (it's invalid C++03 though):

 int IsCxx03()
 {
   auto x = (int *)0;
   return ((int)(x+1) != 1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Definitely interesting –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 24 '11 at 20:23
9  
Technically, this relies on sizeof(int) != 1 being true. On an 0x system with exceptionally large chars, the results could be the same. Still a neat trick, though. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jun 24 '11 at 20:29
    
@Dennis - char is always one byte though –  Node Jun 24 '11 at 23:20
4  
@Node: one byte is not always 8 bits. –  Alexandre C. Jun 24 '11 at 23:48
2  
@Node sizeof(char) will always be 1, by definition. But CHAR_BIT (defined in limits.h) is allowed to be more than 8. As a result, both char and int could have 32 bits, in which case sizeof(int) == 1 (and CHAR_BIT == 32). –  Sjoerd Jun 25 '11 at 1:08
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From this question:

struct T
{
    bool flag;
    T() : flag(false) {}
    T(const T&) : flag(true) {}
};

std::vector<T> test(1);
bool is_cpp0x = !test[0].flag;
share|improve this answer
    
I wondered how this could work; having tried it, it's clear now: there's a little bug. it works if you change the last line to: bool is_cpp0x = !test[0].flag; –  awx Aug 26 '11 at 22:41
1  
plausible: C++0x default constructs T whereas C++03 copy constructs from T() –  awx Aug 26 '11 at 22:49
    
@awx: Yep, good catch. Corrected. –  Alexandre C. Aug 27 '11 at 8:27
add comment

Though not so concise... In current C++, class template name itself is interpreted as a type name (not a template name) in that class template's scope. On the other hand, class template name can be used as a template name in C++0x(N3290 14.6.1/1).

template< template< class > class > char f( int );
template< class > char (&f(...))[2];

template< class > class A {
  char i[ sizeof f< A >(0) ];
};

bool isCpp0x() {
  return sizeof( A<int> ) == 1;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
#include <utility>

template<typename T> void test(T t) { t.first = false; }

bool isCpp0x()
{
   bool b = true;
   test( std::make_pair<bool&>(b, 0) );
   return b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
N.B. technically this tests the standard library not the compiler, and although it is valid C++03 and valid C++0x, it's not valid C++98, so with some tweaks could be made to detect a C++98/C++03/C++0x stdlib –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 25 '11 at 0:34
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