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zcat *.gz | awk '{print $1}' |sort| uniq -c | sed 's/^[ ]\+//g' | cut -d' ' -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -k1n

I get the following output:

      3 648
      3 655
      3 671
      3 673
      3 683
      3 717
      4 18
      4 29
      4 31
      4 34
      4 652
      5 12
      6 24
      6 33
      7 13
     12 10
     13 9
     14 8
     33 7
     73 6
    166 5
    383 4
   1178 3
   3945 2
  26692 1

I don't want repetitions in my 1st column. Example: if my first column is 3 , i should add all the values in the second column that are associated with 3. Thank you

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1  
You can replace sed 's/^[ ]\+//g' | cut -d' ' -f1 in your pipeline with awk '{print $1}'. Also, with sed, if you anchor your pattern with ^ or $ you don't need to use g since that pattern can only occur one time in the line. –  glenn jackman Jun 24 '11 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

Solution using arrays in awk

{
    a[$1]=a[$1]+$2
}
END {
    for (i in a)
        printf("%d\t%d\n", i, a[i])
}

Pipe the output through sort -n once more to have it in ascending order

$ awk -f num.awk numbers | sort -n
3       4047
4       764
5       12
6       57
7       13
12      10
13      9
14      8
33      7
73      6
166     5
383     4
1178    3
3945    2
26692   1
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1  
And with this, the previous sort -k1n in the pipeline can be removed since the output needs to be sorted again anyway. –  glenn jackman Jun 24 '11 at 21:51
    
Hey ..Thank you very much glenn. Gr8 help –  kauschan Jun 28 '11 at 19:16
awk 'NF == 1 {c=$1; print $0} NF>1 {if (c==$1) {print "\t" $2} else {c=$1; print $0}}'

can do it, but please note, that the indentation can be incorrect, as I had used a simple tab \t above.

HTH

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